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ASAP House, Northeastern Net Zero Energy Home

ASAP House

This is the ASAP House, a House About Saving A Planet designed by Laszlo Kiss.  Like many green designs generated these days, this home will be a net zero energy home — it will produce as much energy as it uses over a certain period of time.  To do that, the home will have good insulation, Energy Star lighting fixtures, a 10 kW photovoltaic array, and a geothermal heating and cooling system.  Currently, a prototype ASAP House is being built for Sag Harbor, New York.  Just last month, the factory was moving along well on three modules that will end up completing the home. 

The ASAP house will cost roughly $250-265 psf, depending on site conditions, and is being designed with LEED certification in the works.  It is anticipated that the finished home will be about 2,500 sf, with 4 bedrooms, and 2.5 bathrooms.  It’ll be fun to follow the blog progress and see the finished product.  At that point, we’ll officially have one more prefab contender, and more particularly, one that can service the Northeast! 

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House of Tomorrow, Zero Energy Green Prefab

House of Tomorrow

This green prefab, sponsored by French architecture magazine Architectures à Vivre, was on display last weekend at the Batimat Show in Paris.  I think it’s called La Maison de Demain, which I also think is French for House of Tomorrow.  We’ll go with that as the name for now.  Their website is in French, so if anything, you can glean certain design elements from studying the images.  Some of the below information is from Google’s translation, so I hope it’s accurate. 

The home is built with three prefabricated modules and meant to show that green design can be affordable and attractive.  An important aspect of the house is the open area in the middle, which could be used as a covered patio to extend the footprint of the home into the natural environment.  Everything about the home is green, too, as far as I can tell: FSC-certified wood and siding, green label paints, low-VOC recycled carpet tiles, LED lighting, low-flow toilet, reinforced insulation, and photovoltaic panels.  You’ll also notice the living roof that provides numerous efficiency benefits (and seems to get water from the slanted roof).  In the end, the compact, modern home is very efficient.  Matter of fact, it’s nearly net zero energy consumption once the solar panels are live.  Nice.

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Half-Moon Outfitters Takes Platinum in Green Rehab

Halfmoon

It’s nice to hear about companies that stretch just to get the LEED Platinum certification, especially when it’s easier to go ‘certified’ and brandish that certification like it’s a shiny, new, plug-in hybrid.  Half-Moon Outfitters received the Platinum certification in the middle of the summer for their 9,600 sf distribution center in North Charleston, South Carolina.  They went for Platinum under the LEED-NC 2.2 system, and more importantly, they didn’t skimp in the energy and atmosphere category, opting instead to rack up ten points.  The distribution center was formerly an old Piggly Wiggly store, but it’s been through what could be the greenest renovation in the country.  It’s now a super green, corporate office and distribution center. 

Here’s what they did:  First, they installed two 1550 gallon storage tanks, which combined with the water efficient fixtures and native landscaping, helped them use about 78% less domestic potable water than a conventional building.  Second, they added insulation throughout the building and installed both a 4,900-watt photovoltaic system and 19 SEER efficient Lennox heat pump system.  Third, they switched to energy-efficient fluorescent lamps and found ways to benefit from the building’s east-west orientation (passive and active solar strategies).  Nice work!

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Top-10 Green Building Products 2007 [BuildingGreen]

SunEye from Solmetric

Well, it’s that time again and BuildingGreen, a company that also publishes the GreenSpec Directory, today announced their list of Top-10 Green Building Products.  It’s not so much that these products are better than everything else on the market, although they may be better, it’s that they’re cool additions to the GreenSpec Directory over the last year or so.  Most of the following ten products have multiple environmental attributes, but here’s a slim breakdown:  4 save energy, 2 save water, 3 are made of green materials, 1 helps situate solar power, and 2 avoid hazardous manufacturing/disposal of materials.  Without further ado:

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Helix Wind System, Inexpensive – Reliable – Simple

This is the Helix Wind Turbine, a small-wind, residential scale option that could cut your electricity bills in half, if installed and situated properly.  This 2-kw grid-tie or off-grid system is designed to catch winds at lower speeds.  And it won’t hurt the birds, either.  According to the company’s website, the Helix System is inexpensive, reliable, and simple — it’s a good choice for low wind speed residential and commercial applications. The Savonius turbine based design catches wind from all directions creating smooth powerful torque to spin the electric generator.  Perfect customers live in areas that have amenable small wind zoning and get about 10 mph of wind/cross-winds.  Via EcoGeek.

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Dwelling Dock, Integrating Sustainability and Living

Dwelling Dock

Matt Allert took second place in the Cascadia Region GBC‘s Emerging Green Builders Natural Talent Design Competition this year with his idea, the Dwelling Dock [pdf].  The Dwelling Dock is premised on the idea that sustainability should begin with the most basic building block of our communities: the dwelling.  It’s an attempt to fully integrate the infrastructure of the housing unit with the environment.  Although purely in concept stage, the Dwelling Dock would be prefabricated, and would include all the accoutrements we’ve come to expect in green homes:  pervious paving, recycled materials, living roof, water collection, and photovoltaic panels. 

Allert’s goals for the Dwelling Dock project include some of the following: (1) collect rainwater for re-use, (2) produce energy on-site, (3) minimize site disturbance and preserve existing site resources, (4) use local materials, and (5) integrate sustainable design with recycled, low-VOC materials.  And I’ve got to admit, I really like the design elements.  Butterfly living roof.  3-level living.  A healthy mixture of privacy and transparency.  Would you live in one?

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