Articles With "wood" Tag

A Family Home That’s as One With Nature

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Linda Yates and Paul Holland had decided long ago that they wanted to build a home that would meet very stringent conservationist expectations. More precisely, they wanted to construct a home that would fit into its ecosystem perfectly while restoring the land around it to a state that existed before widespread human settlement began. The construction of the Tah.Mah.Lah. House (which means “mountain lion” in Native American Ohlone) was finished in 2011 and has since earned the LEED Platinum for Homes certification.
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A Treehouse That Teaches Boy Scouts All About Sustainability

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The US-based architecture firm Mithum recently unveiled their latest sustainability project, the so-called Sustainability Treehouse, which was commissioned by The Boy Scouts of America. The structure is the effort of a multidisciplinary team, which created this sustainable and innovative dwelling in the forest of West Virginia. The main goal of the house is to provide an educational platform for visiting boy scouts, and it is filled with a number of interactive exhibits.
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Wooden Skyscraper Wins the eVolo Skyscraper Competition

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This year’s winner of the eVolo Skyscraper Competition is the so-called “Vernacular Versatility” skyscraper, which was designed by the US architect/designer Yong Ju Lee. The “Vernacular Versatility” skyscraper design was inspired by the traditional Korean house called Hanok, the defining characteristic of which is a wooden structure that is completely exposed, along with a tilted roof. The eVolo Skyscraper Completion has been held since 2006 and was established “to recognize outstanding ideas for vertical living through the novel use of technology, materials, programs, aesthetics, and spatial organizations.”
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A Tiny House EcoVillage for the Homeless

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The YouthBuild Program in collaboration with the Alternative Energy Program at New Market Skills Center are busy building a so called Tiny House EcoVillage, which will consist of three 70 square foot tiny mobile sleeping units, and 30 larger, permanent tiny houses. These will be placed in Quixote Village, which is part of Olympia, WA’s Camp Quixote, also known as Olympia’s Homeless Tent City.
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A Home That is Heated and Cooled Organically

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A team of students at Waseda University in Japan have constructed a prototype for a house that can be heated by composting straw. They dubbed the dwelling the “Recipe for Life” house. Using the heat generating composting process for the purpose of heating a dwelling is not a new idea, but it is definitely one that should be explored further, and perhaps brought closer to the public. The Recipe for Life prototype house is certainly an interesting proposition in that regard.
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Supercapacitors Made of Trees

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Supercapacitors are high-power energy storage devices with far-reaching industrial applications, such as electronics, automobiles and aviation. However one of the main reasons why they have not been adopted more widely is the high cost and the difficulty of producing high-quality carbon electrodes needed to build them. But a team of scientists at Oregon State University has made a discovery that could change all that. They found a process by which cellulose heated in a furnace in the presence of ammonia can be turned into fundamental building blocks for supercapacitors. Cellulose is Earth’s most abundant organic polymer and one of the key components of trees. In other words, trees could one day be instrumental in creating high-tech energy storage devices.

The approach discovered by the scientists is capable of producing nitrogen-doped, nanoporous carbon membranes, which form the electrodes of a supercapacitor, in a cost-effective and rapid way. Furthermore, the only byproduct of this process is methane, which can be used immediately as fuel, making the method very environmentally friendly.

The carbon membranes produced with this method are extraordinarily thin at the nano-scale, meaning that one gram of them can have a surface area of nearly 2,000 square meters. This is what makes them so useful in supercapacitors. The process used to create them is basically a one step reaction, which is very fast and cheap to perform.

The scientists themselves were quite surprised at their discovery. As Xiulei (David) Ji, an assistant professor of chemistry in the OSU College of Science and a team member, put it: “For the first time we’ve proven that you can react cellulose with ammonia and create these N-doped nanoporous carbon membranes. It’s surprising that such a basic reaction was not reported before. Not only are there industrial applications, but this opens a whole new scientific area, studying reducing gas agents for carbon activation.”

Supercapacitors are needed primarily for devices where rapid power storage and short, but powerful energy release is required. These include computers and consumer electronics, but can also be used to power cranes, forklifts, and even defibrillators. They can also be used to open emergency slides on an aircraft and for improving the efficiency of hybrid electric cars. Supercapacitors are also capable of capturing energy that might otherwise be wasted, while their energy storage capabilities may also be used to assist the power flow from alternative energy systems, like, for example, wind energy.

Finding a cheap and environmentally benign way of producing these devices is, needless to say, a great breakthrough in the field.

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