Articles With "water efficiency" Tag

West Virginia Gets First LEED-Platinum Certified Home

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Charles Pickering, the founder and CEO of architectural and engineering firm Pickering Associates, recently received a LEED-Platinum rating for his project at 12 Faith Meadows in Williamstown, WV. This is the first LEED Platinum certified home in West Virginia, and boasts of 11 kWDC of generation capacity. The solar system is located in an optimal array on the house and garage roof, and provides all the energy usage needs for the household, with some to sell back through the power grid. The house received a LEED Point Score of 113 and a HERS rating of .43.

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Made in the USA: Green Builder Magazine Showcases Xero Flor Green Roof System

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In August 2013, Green Builder Magazine showcased the best durable/sustainable green building products that are made in the United States, pointing out that American manufacturing creates domestic jobs, reduces the impact of overseas shipping, and often makes use of locally-sourced raw materials.

Among the thirty-one products featured was the Xero Flor Green Roof System (the only green roof system to be included in the issue), which enables builders to create vegetative roofing on surfaces that range from 0 to 45 degree slopes. The Xero Flor system comprises a pre-vegetated mat, XeroTerr growing medium (a mix of compost and porous mineral aggregate), a retention fleece that distributes and stores water within the root zone, drain mat, and root barrier.

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Petworth Rowhouse Received a Net-Zero Rating

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Washington-based builder Tanya Topolewski recently completed the rehab of a 90-year-old rowhouse in the Petworth neighborhood of Washington DC at 411 Varnum Street. The four bedroom and 3.5 bathroom rowhouse was rebuilt from the ground up with the aim of achieving net zero status. The builders are also seeking the LEED Platinum certification for the house.

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The final design went through 15 alterations before the right mix of energy efficiency was settled upon. The east-west position of the house was a hindrance, but the roof was fitted with the maximum number of solar panels that it can hold, which are designed to provide the energy for the entire house. The solar panels were all installed at the maximum 25-degree tilt, since a greater angle would have been a wind hazard. On the final audit, the house received a 0 score on the HERS index. However, the auditor warned that whether the solar panels will produce sufficient energy to keep the house at net-zero will depend on the energy usage habits of the new owner.

All exterior walls of the house were insulated to between R25 to R35, which was achieved through the use of dense pack cellulose or dense pack cellulose and polyiso board. Since the HVAC systems design has a considerable impact on energy efficiency, the air handler was placed inside the building envelope. All except one duct are also placed inside the envelope. All of these ducts are in inside spaces, except for the lines in the attic and those lines are buried under a minimum of 10 inches of insulation.

To ensure maximum sealing, low expansion spray foam was used around the doors and windows, while regular expansion spray foam was used to seal the penetrations to the exterior, floor to floor penetrations, and behind band joists. In addition to that, caulk was used to further seal all the framing seams, cracks, joints, corners and sill plates. The drywall was glued to the studs and joists, while the exterior rigid board was overlapped and tape sealed.

The house was fitted with a 15 SEER/8.7 HSPF high efficiency heat pump system, making in 20% more efficient than the minimum required 13 SEER. Furthermore, the house’s HSPF is 8.7, which falls into most the efficient heat pumps range of between 8 to 10. The attic of the rowhouse if also insulated to minimum R60 with blow in cellulose at a depth of 16-20 inches.

The house was also fitted with Energy Star appliances and low-flow fixtures to maximize water efficiency. The windows and doors installed have ratings of SHGC .3 or better and U-factor .3 or better.

During the reconstruction, many items, such as door, window and base trim, interior doors and interior door hardware (handles, mortise locks, decorative plates, hinges and keys), vintage lighting, bath fixtures, framing lumber including studs, 2×6, 2×8, 2×10 and larger and hardwood flooring were removed, cleaned, stored and reused in the final construction.

The costs of the green elements of the house came to $50,000, which includes $25,000 for the solar panels, $10,000 for the energy recovery ventilator, heat pump, hot water heater, windows and insulation, and $15,000 to meet the requirements of the LEED Platinum certification. The house recently sold for $725,000 to Florence Petizon.

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Merritt Crossing Senior Apartments Named One of 2013 AIA COTE Top Ten Green Projects

Green-Building

The Oakland, CA Merritt Crossing Senior Apartments consist of 70 units, which are reserved for senior citizens with incomes between 30 and 50 percent of the area’s median income. Over half of the apartments in the complex are reserved for the homeless, those at risk of homelessness, or those living with HIV/AIDS. The project was named one of the top ten green projects by AIA COTE in 2013. The building has received the LEED Platinum certification, as well as the Build It Green and Energy Star certifications.

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TrailerFest 2013 Showcases Vintage Camper Trailers

Trailerfest

On a hot summer day in Lodi, California, a community of vintage mid-century trailer restoration enthusiasts held an Open House during their TrailerFest 2013 Rally. Gathering at the Stockton Delta KOA campground, members of VintageCamperTrailers.com invited the general public to tour their tiny homes that have been kept in mint condition, restored, or renovated to be road-worthy dwellings.

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Salvaged Old-World Charm Meets Modern-Day Efficiency in S.C. Cabin

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Jay Hicks didn’t miss a beat when he lost his South Carolina cabin to a fire. He decided to build off of the 80-year-old original structure’s partial wall that had remained standing and devised a plan to have Addison Homes design and build a high-performance, energy efficient home that would have an old-world charm.

Fitting the floor plan to the topography and granite subsurface of the site that is located near Caesars Head State Park, Todd Usher, president of Addison Homes, directed workers to follow the flow of the rock shelf and form a foundation of concrete footings made of recycled content. Rigid foam insulation that was placed under the slab serves as a thermal break. The structure is oriented to benefit from passive solar heating and natural daylighting.

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