Articles With "residential" Tag

Northern New Jersey Attached Residence + Spa + Tennis Court Gets Sustainable

Night_court_exteriorTranslucent, shimmery, membraneous, sustainable. When I saw the look of this tennis court in Architectural Digest, I was blown away…and I don’t even play tennis.  (By the way, October 2006 AD is chock full of modern + sustainable architecture!)  At Jetson Green, I talk a ton about residential green spaces or commercial skyscrapers, etc., but I haven’t spent that much time on sustainable structures crafted specifically for sport, hobby, or play.  Architect Robert Rhodes put together a striking, modern tennis court/spa/attached residence for a client that I need to share.

Just a short skip down a slate trail from the main residence is this tennis court embedded in a New York investment banker’s 8 acre, well-wooded property.  The goal for the architect was to conform to the local zoning requirements, apply sustainable building principles, and keep consistent with the surrounding flora.  I think they did a phenomenal job. 

Green Features:
The client + architect wanted the court to "look like trees."  Here’s what they did to keep it green + sustainable.  First, they built the tennis court into the ground so that the structure wouldn’t stick out.  The same principle applied when they decided to use tennis-green, transparent polycarbonate-panels; the panels allow enough light inside for day use and keep out the harsh sunlight for cooling purposes.  Second, the court’s energy is supplied by two geothermal wells.  And third, they used an ipe deck (economic + ecologic) between the attached residence and court.  Also note, there is a subterranean spa below the deck that connects the guesthouse and court.   Investment banker Cribs anyone?

Court_image_1 Spa_court_image Attached_residence

The laminated-wood beams stretch vertically, almost as if they are the actual trees that surround the court.  Aesthetically, the panel and beam design finishes out the structure so that it blends and matches the surrounding environment.  And while I think this investment banker won’t be able to practice his lob, he surely will be able to relax, spa, and play tennis in a court fit for English royalty!

Extra Links:
Robert Rhodes Architecture [picture source]
Architectural Digest Website [article not online]
 

Real Estate Forum Article Interviews Experts + Predicts Future Green Building

Re_forum_september_cover_2006_1 There are still some people out there that don’t believe green + sustainable building will last.  In the September edition of Real Estate Forum magazine, there is a lengthy article with reflections and predictions from some of the most notable names in real estate (for example, Milton Cooper, CEO Kimco Realty Corp.; Richard Camp, Chairman + CEO Camden Properties Trust; and Michael Pralle, President + CEO GE Real Estate).  These are the heavy hitters of real estate–people that make it their business to look forward and understand the trends affecting the industry.  That said, I found two quotes that I had to pass on to the Jetson Green readership…

RE Forum was able to catch up with Jeffrey Schwartz, CEO of ProLogis, and ask him what he thinks will affect the industrial sector.  He said,

Jeffrey_schwartz_prologisIn terms of sustainability, governments and corporations are becoming more sensitive to the environmental impact of industrial development.  It’s amazing the amount of energy you can save with the quality of a facility and the air-tightness of the building.  The costs are slightly higher, but the payback is phenomenal for the customer, from both sustainability and an economic standpoint.  It takes a lot less money to heat and cool buildings if they are properly constructed and more environmentally conscious. 

Later in the article, RE Forum quoted Gerald D. Hines, Chairman + Founder of Hines, with respect to his opinions on the future of real estate development.  He said,

Gerald_hinesIt becomes increasingly clear that improving cities is not only the right thing to do, but good business as well.  Five decades ago, there was a tremendous move to the suburbs; today there is a return to the cities…rather than developing greenfields, … many developers are returning to their urban roots and transforming abandoned industrial sites–brownfields–into new uses.  Therefore, now, more than ever, sustainability has become a key component of development. 

These are seasoned professionals talking about sustainability, green buildings, and environmentally-conscious development.  This is mainstream stuff.  I keep saying this, but it seems that some of the professionals out there aren’t listening:  Green building is the future.  Since 90% of the world hasn’t caught on, you have a competitive advantage to exploit. 

There's a New Prefab in Town: Michelle Kaufmann Designs + mkSolaire

Mksolaire If you haven’t noticed, there’s a new prefab in town.  But if you’ve been following the modern prefab movement, you’ll recognize this newest installment comes from an experienced architect:  Michelle Kaufann Designs.  MKD is behind the glidehouse and sunset breezehouse prefabs that have become the talk in modern + sustainable building circles.  But these aren’t just prefab concepts or designs.  Recently, MKD finished building the first U.S. factory dedicated to sustainable, modular custom homes (www.mkConstructs.com).  This Washington (state) factory is wholly-owned by MKD and will serve California, Washington, Oregon, and Hawaii. 

Solaire_interior The mkSolaire is an open, loft-like home designed for healthy, green living in the urban context.  The architecturally designed roof and windows allow a perfect mixture of air and light to enter the home.  Initial design to completion lead time is roughly 8-14 months, which varies depending on a variety of factors specific to your design and location.  Some of the things that will be available include solar panel roofing, geothermal system, wind generator system, hybrid system, icynene insulation, bamboo or reclaimed wood flooring, recycled paper countertops, recycled glass countertops, on-demand water heaters, water-saving dual-flush toilets, non-toxic paints, and formaldehyde-free cabinetry, etc. 

Solaire_roofSolaire_18  Solaire_17

Because the mkSolaire is built from a modular system, there are endless possibilities as far as layouts and floorplans.  The website has 5+ floorplan options, but it looks like those can be further customized.  And if you’re really interested in taking the plunge, MKD has tried to take the sting out of prefab costing by explaining how it all works.  This stuff isn’t cheap:  factory costs ($150-175 square foot), transportation + installation ($3,000 – $8,000 per module), site costs (depends on location), and miscellaneous costs (permit fees, architectural and engineering fees, sales tax for some states, appliance costs, add-on costs, etc.).  That said, homes do come with high-end Kohler  and Hansgrohe fixtures, Anderson windows + doors, and slate-tile flooring.

I could go on and on, so feel free to visit their site and see if this looks like something you’re interested in.  As far as modern + green custom architectural design is concerned, this is about as good an option as they come.  Source via Linton + Yahoo Finance

Green Building Throwback: Landscaping Common Sense

Colonial_home I was reading an article somewhere that said one could increase a home’s value by planting trees and properly landscaping the grounds.  Ostensibly, there are two reasons for this:  first, trees and landscaping can make a house look good, and second, they take time and care to grow, so mature landscaping illustrates the care a homeowner gives to their residence.  (Aside: this reason is akin to buying a 3 year-old vehicle from a retired person that only put 15,000 miles on it and stored it in the garage.)  But if we pay attention to history, there is a third reason–one that affects a home’s livability and monthly costs.  Proper landscaping can provide cooling for the interior. 

I came across this old Philadelphia, Pennsylvania statute from about 1672 that I think applies: 

Springfield_colonial_homeEvery owner or inhabitant of any and every house in Philadelphia, Newcastle and Chester shall plant one or more tree or trees, viz., pines, unbearing mulberries, water poplars, lime or other shady and wholesome trees before the door of his, her or their house and houses, not exceeding eight feet from the front of the house, and preserving the same, to the end that the said town may be well shaded from the violence of the sun in the heat of summer and thereby rendered more healthy

We’re talking about a time when people didn’t have air conditioning or electricity.  Sure, they lived differently and had different lifestyles, but I like to think they wanted to stay cool when they could.  So landscaping can have a dramatic effect on the interior temperature of your home.  Well-shaded homes requires less air conditioning and that cuts back on your electricity/energy bills.  Proper landscape planning will allow you to maximize natural light and minimize violent sun rays.  And this is important to healthy home living. 

Green Renovation 101: Herd Theory Approach

Aia_study_popular_feature_graph_2 You’re thinking about selling your house within the next year and want to make some changes to add legitimate value to the place.  You really want to differentiate your home from other similar homes within a mile (or so), but you don’t know how to do it.  Plus, analysts are talking about how the market is overvalued and house prices may drop–the temperature is rising with the increasing tension in house prices, interest rates, and hold-out buyers.  Well, there’s a report out called "High Energy Costs Inspire New Features in Homes," prepared by American Institute of Architects (AIA) Chief Economist Kermit Baker, PhD, Hon. AIA.  I think this is an excellent source of information. 

Efficiency gains can be found in low-tech or high-tech renovations.  With concerns over high energy prices, one of the most popular renovations, according to the study, was to place extra insulation in the attic.  A cooler roof + attic lessens the burden on your air conditioner in the home.  Also, some other features that declined in popularity were larger hallways/increased circulation and upscale entryways.  These features add space (and energy requirements) to the home but they don’t add any usable space.  If I were building a new house, these statistics would be really important to the design of my house, especially if I were considering selling the place at anytime in the distant future. 

Aia_study_popular_products_1 The study also pointed out home products that are gaining in popularity.  As you can see, the most popular products were those that manage energy consumption and have low maintenance.  The "energy efficient" category includes items such as triple glazed windows.  Notice the popularity of the tankless water heater and water saving devices.  Lots of cities are feeling the crunch of water shortages…it’s nice not to be tied to "hog"-style use of water and electricity.

Look at this study as a trend barometer that lays out what people most demand and will soon come to be expected in future houses.  If you want to replace the water heater and happen to have some extra cash, get the tankless–they have tax incentives for those things and it’s not that bad of an investment.  Homebuilders will catch on to these trends and moving forward, all houses will come standard with energy-efficient features. 

Application:
If you want to sell, get on board and bring your home up to par with features that people want.  It’ll make the broker’s job that much easier.

Extra Links:
Remodeling: Going "Green" May Not Save Green [Residential Architect]
More Home Markets "extremely" Overvalued [CNNMoney.com]

ScrapHouse Illustrates Re-use, Recycle, Repurpose Principles (aka Innovation)

Scraphouse The ScrapHouse is a "temporary demonstration home, blitz-built using scrap and salvaged material."  I looks really cool…so cool, you’d probably bid for it on ebay if you saw it.  What?  It’s not on ebay; it doesn’t exist anymore.  But it was built so cheap, you’d think it could be listed.  Buy it Now Price: under $2,000.  When you think about a 1,000 square foot house, you don’t think about building one for $2,000.  That’s exactly what a "rockstar team of local artists, engineers, architects, city officials, and builders" did in association with Public Architecture and ScrapHouse in SFC. 

Reuse is the operative word with this architectural feat.  It was built with materials collected from salvage yards, dumps, and waste piles at active construction sites.  Now, materials DO tend to walk away at construction sites, but from what I understand, there was no five-finger discounting involved with this process.  In all honesty, new building construction (non-LEED structures) generate tons of waste and scrap, and a lot of it can be used for a different project or purpose, depending on the necessity.  Again, another ebay concept applies:  "one person’s junk is another person’s treasure." 

Scraphouse_rending Of course, they used Energy Star appliances inside and low- to no-VOC/formaldehyde free materials in the furniture and paint, etc.  The key take away point is that we need to think outside the box and get creative about using already existing materials (junk that’s in abundance) in nascent, healthy ways.  That doesn’t necessarily mean you live swap-meet-style (not that that’s a bad thing), but it does mean that re-purposed, recycled stuff can be modern and swank.  We just need to get creative about finding that stuff.

Extra Links:
ScrapHouse Official Press Release 5/31/2006
Inhabitat Blog Post About Documentary Premiere

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