Planes Upcycled Into Garden Offices

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The firm Dappr Aviation’s Aeropod has come up with a very unique design for garden offices, sheds, bars or extra bedrooms. They are building these structures out of decommissioned planes by using parts of the fuselage as the main building block. The structures are called Aeropods, which is quite an apt name. (more…)

By |October 12th, 2016|Modern design|0 Comments

One World Trade Center Awarded LEED Gold

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One World Trade Center, built by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, has recently been awarded the LEED Gold certification due to its sustainable design. Given its height, and its completely glazed façade, that’s quite impressive.

One World Trade Center was completed in 2016, and measures exactly 1,776 ft (541 m) in height. This number is symbolic and represents the year 1776, which is when the US declared its independence. It was built on the spot where the North Tower once stood. As already mentioned, the façade is glazed and features a glass curtain wall, which surrounds the building from the 20th floor all the way up to the observation deck. The glass is coated so that glare, ultra-violet and infrared light is reduced, while it allows natural light through, so that it reaches over 90 percent of the total office area in the building. This greatly offsets the need for artificial lighting. (more…)

By |October 11th, 2016|Green Building|0 Comments

Couple Build a Tiny Home Together

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It’s great when two people whose outlook on life come together, and such is certainly the case with Carissa and Noel, a Californian couple who recently finished constructing their tiny home. Carissa is an interior designer and Noel comes from a construction background so they were perfectly matched in this area too. (more…)

By |October 10th, 2016|Green Building|0 Comments

Student Housing Made of Shipping Containers

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Shipping container architecture seems to be once again becoming quite popular. The well-known Danish firm Bjarke Ingels Group has recently completed a sustainable floating housing prototype for students living in Copenhagen. The project was commissioned by Urban Rigger, a local student housing startup. This student housing is made from repurposed shipping containers, and designed in a way that makes it possible to easily and quickly replicate the design just about anywhere.

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This so-called Copenhagen Urban Rigger housing is made of nine recycled shipping containers, which rest top a floating base in the harbor in Copenhagen. The entire structure has a total floorspace of 7,319 sq ft (680 sq m), which is divided up between the actual housing units, as well as a common garden/courtyard area, a bathing platform, a BBQ area, a kayak landing point, and a sitting area. The structure also features a communal roof terrace and a basement level, which has 12 storage rooms, a laundry room, and a technical room. (more…)

By |September 26th, 2016|Container Design|0 Comments

Tiny Home Fits Family of Three

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Tiny homes are considered too small for families by many, but some are still making it work. Like the couple living in this 400 sq ft home with their baby and dog. Their home was designed by Tiny Portable Cedar Cabins of Idaho.

The so-called Urban Cabin measure s12 ft by 28 ft, and showcases a wonderful blend of rustic and modern elements, complete with a shed-style roof. It’s also quite mobile, since it is considered a park model RV, meaning it’s possible to move it using a semi-trailer truck. Though it wasn’t designed to be hauled around as often as other, smaller tiny (more…)

By |September 22nd, 2016|Modern design|0 Comments

Couple Converts School Bus Into a Home

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Living in a mobile home is a dream for many, and there are many ways of living that dream. Filmmaker Felix Starck and musician Selima Taibi are a young German couple hailing from Berlin, and they recently transformed a yellow school bus into a cozy and quite comfortable home for themselves and their dog Rudi. They plan to live in it full time, while traveling from Alaska to South America. (more…)

By |September 21st, 2016|Green Building|0 Comments