MOMO by Thomas Lind, Living Modular Getaway

MOMO Swedish Prefab

This is MOMO, a prefab concept designed by Thomas Lind.  The word MOMO comes from the truncation of Modernistiskt Modulhuskoncept, which is Swedish for modern modular house concept.  MOMO homes are put together using 107 sf modules that aren’t particularly made with any special green elements other than to be built with high quality, healthy materials.  That said, the concept also calls for a living roof with a blend of native water-storing succulents and grasses.  The large, wind-sail looking outdoor roof blurs the boundary between interior and exterior with shade and a congregational patio — and if you’re in the right climate, it’d be quite nice to chill in and out of the home.  Modules price in at roughly $25,000 each, and the first MOMO summer houses will be built in Sweden in mid-2008.  So, the final product won’t necessarily be huge, but it’s certain to be sufficient. 

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By |October 21st, 2007|Modern architecture, Nature, Prefab, Single Family|0 Comments

Project Drop House, Minimalist Home Inspiration

Drop House - Blog Love - Click to Read About It

By |October 6th, 2007|Modern architecture, Prefab|0 Comments

Napa Prefab Now For Rent!

Napa Prefab

Have you ever wanted to walk through a prefab or see what the excitement is about in person?  If you live on the west coast, the opportunity to walk through a prefab happens fairly frequently.  Just wait for the right conference or event and you'll hear about a tour or walk through.  Now, two hours north of San Francisco in Napa County (Pope Valley), there's a Rocio Romero prefab open for tour, rental, or even for commercial photo, movie, and production shoots. 

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By |September 27th, 2007|Modern architecture, Prefab|3 Comments

Pirates Bay House, Partially Prefab + Green

Pirates Bay House

Many of you have probably seen this house by Stuart Tanner Architects, it was the Architectural Record House of the Month in July 2006.  But I just noticed it and want to post a few images.  It’s a small house of 1,184 sf located near Eaglehawk Neck on Tasmania’s Tasman Peninsula.  As you can see, it juts out into the air, blending the boundary between the wildlife and sea.  I’m sure the owners have witnessed the grandeur of nature at its best, being enveloped by the eucalypt forest and the sea.  Due to the location, the architect had the home partially prefabricated — framing was complete in two days.  The home also has many of the green features most homes should have, such as energy-saving lights, heating, and appliances.  It’s well-insulated throughout and designed to maximize cross ventilation.  And there’s an on-site waste management system, greywater recycling, and fresh water catchment and storage, too. 

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Before Buying a Prefab [Blogging NYT]

PrefabArtWeb by Nancy Doninger

Over the weekend, I noticed another good article in the NY Times by Amy Gunderson, with the above illustration by Nancy Doninger.  The article makes some salient points about prefab, things that must be considered before getting into it.  For instance, one customer said "there is no substitute for seeing a house in person," because what you see online or in a rendering, may not be what you actually get.  The same customer opted for Rocio Romero, and the home took 10 months to build at a cost of $300 psf (including installation and finishes).  That price ends up being pretty decent, when compared to the cost of going after a custom-design modernist home. 

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By |September 26th, 2007|Modern architecture, News, Prefab|0 Comments

Tread Lightly Modular Prototype House

Tread Lightly House

The Tread Lightly House was designed by Garrison Architects for a site where the building footprint had to be minimal because of nearby wetlands.  This modular house prototype touches lightly on the earth, demonstrating a different way to reduce the home’s ecological footprint and help minimize the impact of the built environment on nature.  Prefabricated construction of the home draws upon an ecologically friendly modular design which is fast and easy to build (not to mention, offers the potential for saved energy, time, money, and natural resources).  You can read more about this + other green projects at the Garrison Architects blog

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By |September 20th, 2007|Land Use, Modern architecture, Prefab|0 Comments