Canadian Tiny House With a Cool Deck

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The company Greenmoxie of Toronto, Canada recently unveiled a sustainable tiny home, which can withstand even the harsh conditions of a Canadian winter. The home is cozy on the inside, and looks like a quaint cabin from the outside. It also features a unique drawbridge deck, which extends the living area very nicely.

The home is 30 ft long, 8.5 ft wide and 13.5 ft high (9 m by 2.6 m by 4m), which yields 340 sq ft (31.6 sq m) of interior space. It was built using reclaimed and salvaged materials, including wood from a demolished old barn. The interior was left as open as possible, with the sofa and shelving placed close to the walls instead of cluttering up the central space. The home also features an RV-style table surface, which can be used as a dining table or a coffee table. (more…)

By |November 29th, 2016|Modern design|0 Comments

Couple Creates Cozy Home in a Van

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Full time traveling, at least for a while, is the dream of many, and artist Kelsey and journalist Corbin of Steps to Wander have made it a reality. They converted an old Ford E-350 El Dorado Encore camper van into a cozy home, which they can easily take on the road. The young couple from Portland, Oregon, are currently living in the van full time as they travel east along the US-Canadian border. (more…)

By |November 21st, 2016|Affordable|0 Comments

New Shipping Container Hostel Built in Vietnam

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This interesting cargotecture creation was recently completed by the company TAK Architects. It is a hostel located in the Vietnamese ocean resort town of Nha Trang and is comprised of a stack of three recycled shipping containers, which where painted in bright colors and contain family-sized and multi bed dormitory style rooms. (more…)

By |November 18th, 2016|Container Design|0 Comments

Recycled Materials Used to Build a Modern Home in India

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Using recycled and reclaimed materials when building homes and other structures is slowly, but surely catching on. One recent example of just how great such an endeavor can prove is the home in Mumbai, India, which was designed by the firm S+PS Architects. To construct this home they used reclaimed doors, windows and even pipes, which they salvaged from several demolition sites in the area (more…)

By |November 1st, 2016|Modern design|0 Comments

Vintage Trailer Becomes Cool Family Home

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Jordan Menzel of Salt Lake City, Utah recently converted a vintage 1976 Airstream Trailer into a cozy, quirky tiny home. He’d come across the trailer by chance and even though he’d never lived in a tiny home before (or a trailer, for that matter), he decided to buy it. It cost him $4000, and it is now a full-time home for him and his young daughter.

The trailer is a 29-foot-long Ambassador class Airstream, and he spent about three months turning it into a home. He started the renovation by first removing all the shag-carpet lining the interior. This was followed by removing the cabinetry, and completely redoing it using reclaimed pallet wood. He also used the latter to build a new closet. He set out to create a very open interior, which now feels cozy and spacious, rather than cramped and cluttered as Airstream interiors tend to be. (more…)

By |October 26th, 2016|Green Building|0 Comments

One World Trade Center Awarded LEED Gold

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One World Trade Center, built by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, has recently been awarded the LEED Gold certification due to its sustainable design. Given its height, and its completely glazed façade, that’s quite impressive.

One World Trade Center was completed in 2016, and measures exactly 1,776 ft (541 m) in height. This number is symbolic and represents the year 1776, which is when the US declared its independence. It was built on the spot where the North Tower once stood. As already mentioned, the façade is glazed and features a glass curtain wall, which surrounds the building from the 20th floor all the way up to the observation deck. The glass is coated so that glare, ultra-violet and infrared light is reduced, while it allows natural light through, so that it reaches over 90 percent of the total office area in the building. This greatly offsets the need for artificial lighting. (more…)

By |October 11th, 2016|Green Building|0 Comments