Energy Harnessed From Waves Could be on the Horizon

wavecarpet.jpg.662x0_q100_crop-scale

A team of researchers at UC Berkeley is developing a hydraulic seafloor ‘carpet’ that could be used to harvest the energy of ocean waves and convert it to usable clean energy. Since waves are constant, as opposed to sun and wind, this could prove a viable source of carbon-free energy for coastal regions. Wave energy is considered a huge potential source of renewable energy, but the systems for harnessing it are still very underdeveloped. Since there has been a rise in population in coastal cities this form of energy harvesting could prove a great, and, more importantly, clean source of renewable energy.
(more…)

By |June 7th, 2014|Green Tech|1 Comment

Bacteria-Made Bricks Could be the Building Blocks of the Future

biobrick2

The bio-technology startup bioMason, headed by founder Ginger Krieg Dosier, recently introduced an innovative brick that is grown rather than fried. These naturally-grown bricks are made from sand and bacteria, which grow to produce natural cement. The needed building blocks for these bricks are abundant in nature across the globe and can be extracted from waste streams. The natural cementation of bioMason’s bricks occurs in ambient temperatures, which is one of their biggest advantages.
(more…)

By |June 3rd, 2014|Green Building|3 Comments

Energy Efficient T8 LED Lamps by Cree

socket

The commercial sector, which includes commercial and institutional buildings as well as street and highway lighting, consumes the majority of kilowatt-hours of energy per year, which is why it is so important that they start using LED based lighting. Most of these commercial buildings and places are also fitted with fluorescent sockets based on the T8 standard. This is the main reason why developing T8 LED lamps could have such a huge impact on conserving energy.
(more…)

By |May 16th, 2014|Green Tech|0 Comments

A Stylish Solar Charger for Your Gadgets

charger

A few years ago, the company Rawlemon designed a spherical lens solar generator, which works better to capture solar energy than a regular solar panel array, and looks much better. The original Rawlemon spherical lens solar generator was created by a Barcelona designer and architect André Broessel of Beta Torics. The system basically uses a large glass ball that is filled with water to concentrate the sun’s energy onto a PV panel. In this way the suns energy is concentrated by up to 10,000 times. The ball can also be rotated and includes a tracking system, meaning that energy collection is maximized throughout the day. However, the design has some serious drawbacks, such as weight of the water-filled ball, which can’t really be supported by most roofs. Another drawback is the problem of producing the glass balls of sufficient quality and size.
(more…)

By |April 28th, 2014|Green Tech|2 Comments

Colorado’s First Passive House

ext

Brookfield Residential’s Midtown Residence Eight in Denver, is the first Colorado home to receive the Passive House Institute U.S. (PHIUS) certification. It is also the first house made by a US production builder to receive this certification. The home was designed by KGA Studio Architects.
(more…)

By |April 25th, 2014|Passive House|7 Comments

San Francisco Resident to Build a Home From Bay Bridge Scraps

Bay_Bridge_House_Design_front1-805x525

David Grieshaber, co-founder of the community-supported organization Bay Bridge House, has recently received permission to use the remains of the old San Francisco Bay Bridge, which has been replaced by a new, earthquake resistant structure, to build a house from. For this purpose, he plans to use the vintage I-beams, concrete, girders, trusses, roadways, and other parts of the old cantilever bridge.
(more…)

By |March 19th, 2014|Modern architecture|2 Comments