Articles With "Development" Tag

A Green Family Home Made from Recycled Shipping Containers

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This unique, green family residence was constructed in Flagstaff, Arizona in March 2011. The home measures 2,000-square-feet and features 2 loft bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 office rooms, and a storage room, and a green house/solarium. The residence was made from six recycled shipping containers. Apart from that, the home was also designed with long term sustainability and energy efficiency in mind. The concept for the home was developed by Ecosa Institute, while in 2010 the house also received an award from the Coconino County Sustainable Building Program. The home took about two years to build.

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Philadelphia’s First Passive House Multi-Family Complex Ready for Occupancy

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After years in limbo, Philadelphia’s first multi-family Passive House housing project is finished and on the market. Located at 219-235 W. George St., the homes were developed by the Onion Flats group in association with Domani Developers. The housing complex is known as the Onion Flats Stable. Of the projected 70 units, the team later downsized the project to only 27 units due to financial difficulties.

The units have a net living area of 2500 square feet, which includes 3 bedrooms and office space, and 3 bathrooms. About one third of the units in this development are set to be Affordable Housing units. This housing project was designed to obtain the LEED Platinum status, making it the first multi apartment complex in the US to receive this certification.

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Petworth Rowhouse Received a Net-Zero Rating

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Washington-based builder Tanya Topolewski recently completed the rehab of a 90-year-old rowhouse in the Petworth neighborhood of Washington DC at 411 Varnum Street. The four bedroom and 3.5 bathroom rowhouse was rebuilt from the ground up with the aim of achieving net zero status. The builders are also seeking the LEED Platinum certification for the house.

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The final design went through 15 alterations before the right mix of energy efficiency was settled upon. The east-west position of the house was a hindrance, but the roof was fitted with the maximum number of solar panels that it can hold, which are designed to provide the energy for the entire house. The solar panels were all installed at the maximum 25-degree tilt, since a greater angle would have been a wind hazard. On the final audit, the house received a 0 score on the HERS index. However, the auditor warned that whether the solar panels will produce sufficient energy to keep the house at net-zero will depend on the energy usage habits of the new owner.

All exterior walls of the house were insulated to between R25 to R35, which was achieved through the use of dense pack cellulose or dense pack cellulose and polyiso board. Since the HVAC systems design has a considerable impact on energy efficiency, the air handler was placed inside the building envelope. All except one duct are also placed inside the envelope. All of these ducts are in inside spaces, except for the lines in the attic and those lines are buried under a minimum of 10 inches of insulation.

To ensure maximum sealing, low expansion spray foam was used around the doors and windows, while regular expansion spray foam was used to seal the penetrations to the exterior, floor to floor penetrations, and behind band joists. In addition to that, caulk was used to further seal all the framing seams, cracks, joints, corners and sill plates. The drywall was glued to the studs and joists, while the exterior rigid board was overlapped and tape sealed.

The house was fitted with a 15 SEER/8.7 HSPF high efficiency heat pump system, making in 20% more efficient than the minimum required 13 SEER. Furthermore, the house’s HSPF is 8.7, which falls into most the efficient heat pumps range of between 8 to 10. The attic of the rowhouse if also insulated to minimum R60 with blow in cellulose at a depth of 16-20 inches.

The house was also fitted with Energy Star appliances and low-flow fixtures to maximize water efficiency. The windows and doors installed have ratings of SHGC .3 or better and U-factor .3 or better.

During the reconstruction, many items, such as door, window and base trim, interior doors and interior door hardware (handles, mortise locks, decorative plates, hinges and keys), vintage lighting, bath fixtures, framing lumber including studs, 2×6, 2×8, 2×10 and larger and hardwood flooring were removed, cleaned, stored and reused in the final construction.

The costs of the green elements of the house came to $50,000, which includes $25,000 for the solar panels, $10,000 for the energy recovery ventilator, heat pump, hot water heater, windows and insulation, and $15,000 to meet the requirements of the LEED Platinum certification. The house recently sold for $725,000 to Florence Petizon.

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