1920s Grocery Store Renovation Uses Passive Sustainability to Inspire Similar Projects


Incorporated in 1839, Chattanooga, Tennessee was a boom town by the time the railroad arrived in 1850. “Where the cotton meets the corn,” Chattanooga had a strategic cultural location between the north and the south, which put it in proximity of some of the worst of the Civil War battles. By 1969, the industrialized city of Chattanooga had been declared by the federal government to have the nation’s dirtiest air.

Shovel all the coal in

Gotta keep it rollin’

Woo, woo, Chattanooga there you are

-from Chattanooga Choo Choo (words by Mack Gorden, music by Harry Warren)

Recent efforts by the private and government sectors to revitalize areas of downtown and the riverfront have won the city several national and regional awards for livability, excellence in housing, and consolidated planning.


By |August 22nd, 2013|Passive House|5 Comments

Halls Ridge Knoll Guest House Sets High Standards for 2013 AIA Housing Awards


Halls-Ridge-Knoll-Guest-House-12Designed by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, the Halls Ridge Knoll Guest House has won the 2013 American Institute of Architects (AIA) Housing Award in the One and Two Family Custom category.

With details of glass, timber, and stone that is responsive to the surrounding hillside, this guesthouse is one element in a vacation retreat that is located on a former cattle ranch in the Santa Lucia Preserve near Carmel, California. Additional structures on the retreat include the main residence and a workshop.


By |August 12th, 2013|Passive House|2 Comments

Park Passive is First Certified Passive House in Seattle


Attendees of the 2013 Explore Design Home Tour, sponsored by American Institute of Architects (AIA) Seattle, will get up close and personal with Park Passive, one of seven homes on the Tour and the first home in Seattle to be designated as a Passive House in accordance with the requirements set by Passive House Academy as authorized by the Passivhaus Institut. Passivhaus sets international standards for a certification program by which ultra-low energy buildings are evaluated.


By |August 5th, 2013|Passive House|3 Comments

Earthship Farmstead Receives Passive House Certification


Kaplan Thompson Architects were challenged by their clients to build a farmstead home in the mountains of Virginia that could not only meet standards for Passivhaus and LEED, but include a roof on which sheep could graze.

The solution: Earthship Farmstead is a house that is nestled in the east-facing hillside with a floorplan that fits the contours of the surrounding fields. The dining and living room extend out onto the hill to allow south-facing shaded windows to capture warmth and light from the sun. Recently, Earthship Farmstead received Passive House certification and is gathering data toward LEED Platinum certification.


By |May 30th, 2013|Passive House|1 Comment

Certified Passive House in Oregon Maximizes Reduce-Reuse-Recycle Concepts


The founder of Oregon-based STUDIO-E Architecture, Jan Fillinger, is a Certified Passive House Consultant and LEED AP who has over twenty years experience in sustainable design, including the use of sustainable and non-toxic materials, integration of energy-efficient building systems, and the design of site- and climate-responsive buildings. Switzerland born and raised, with a Master of Architecture from the University of California at Berkeley, Fillinger has designed projects that have won multiple awards and incorporate environmental and social responsibility, with a primary goal of creating “harmonious and comfortable spaces in which people truly enjoy living and working.”


By |May 2nd, 2013|Passive House|1 Comment

Ultra-Low Passivhaus Energy Standard Met by Dwell Development’s Columbia Station Micro-Community


The first spec home in the Pacific Northwest to meet Passivhaus standards is in the Columbia Station green micro-community built by the award-winning design+build boutique firm, Dwell Development. Passivhaus is an energy standard that is more difficult to achieve than LEED with respect to energy efficiency. Homes that meet the Passivhaus standard must reach thermal comfort levels by postheating or postcooling fresh air without necessitating recirculation.


By |March 19th, 2013|Passive House|5 Comments