ChooseRenewables.com, Site Specific Energy Analysis

Hypothetical Installation

Here’s a little shout out for a brand spanking new website called ChooseRenewables.com.  I like the website because it empowers individuals with facts necessary to live in a more sustainable way.  Included below are images of my experiment with CR, but this is all specific to MY HOME ADDRESS.  Every location is different, so feel free to plug in your address and see what it provides.

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By |September 20th, 2007|Conservation, Energy Efficiency, Gadgets, Solar, Wind|0 Comments

Seattle Off-Grid Concept Combines Chickens, Crops + Sustainable Living (S2)

Center for Urban Agriculture

In the heart of Seattle, the design professionals at Mithun see a farm rising vertically into the sky.  Although it may never be built, the Center for Urban Agriculture (CUA) won “Best of Show” in the Cascadia Region Green Building Council’s Living Building Challenge.  Vertically constructed on a .72 acre site, the off-grid building is designed to be completely energy and water sufficient and will include 318 affordable apartments (studio – 2 bedroom).  And on top of that, there will be greenhouses, rooftop gardens, a chicken farm, and fields for growing vegetables and grains. 

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Net Metering, Minimum Floor Areas, Kendall House, Green Banks + Natural Landscaping (WIR)

Week in Review

Nascent Home Tech Aims to Slash Energy Hogs

House Off Switch GreenSwitch

When I was growing up, if there was an errant light or something on, my dad would take my brothers and sisters into the room and say something like, "kids, this light isn’t going to turn itself off and it isn’t free to keep on either."  Needless to say, I learned to turn things off at a young age.  To make this process easier, two pieces of technology aim to eliminate the need to micro-manage electronics in your home. 

There’s the GreenSwitch and the House-Off Switch.  The premise of each is that there’s a singular switch that turns off all non-essential electronic items that have been set up to the switch.  The designer of the House-Off Switch (pictured top left) is Jack Godfrey Wood, who is based in London (and I’m not sure whether his concept is being marketed at this point).  The GreenSwitch (pictured top right) is the real deal and is supported by our favorite green expert, Ed Begley Jr.

Here’s how the GreenSwitch works.  The central switch controls all the slave components that have been set up and home installation takes about an hour.  There are 4 simple pieces you may use: (1) master switch, (2) thermostat control, (3) slave wall switches, and (4) outlets.  You decide what you have a tendency to leave on or which areas are vampires and install the proper piece at that position.  The relay between the master and slave is wireless, microchip-controlled radio frequency (RF) based communication, so there’s no getting in the attic with wires, etc.  And as a side note, according to the Department of Energy, 10-15% of the what you pay for on your energy bill is from stand-by or phantom power, so to the extent that you can trim that down, you’re saving money.  Basic Kit MSRPs for $1125.00. 

By |September 11th, 2007|Conservation, Energy Efficiency, Gadgets, Materials|0 Comments

Shaming Building Owners into Using Less Energy

Haringey Interactive Heat Loss Map

A quick, but interesting, little tidbit of information … in Haringey, a city in the UK, the city council hired a company to use a military-style plane outfitted with a thermal imaging to take pictures of every structure in the area.  They took the heat loss information from the pictures and created a color-coded map identifying the various levels of heat loss for each building.  As you can see from the image shot above, the dark red homes are really losing some heat.  By visiting the Haringey Interactive Heat Loss Map, you can scroll over each gray dot and get the address of that particular energy loser.  I’m not sure if the data has led to any improvements (there’s definitely a concern over privacy here in the U.S.), but it’s probably led to some interesting discussions: "Excuse me neighbor, did you know you’re a red house?  Well, I’m a blue house and I think I can help…"  Via CD + TechDirt

By |September 9th, 2007|Conservation, Energy Efficiency, Gadgets, News|0 Comments

[Video] XtremeHomes, Future of Green Housing

Cnet

CNET and Michael Kanellos went on the scene at XtremeHomes‘ factory to walk through the process of building a modern home.  The video is just over 3 minutes long and talks about the efficiencies and environmental benefits of factory-built homes.  Towards the end, there’s a small portion with Michelle Kaufmann demonstrating the NanaWall; she’s having the mkLotus built right now at XtremeHomes’ factory and the home will be unveiled at West Coast Green.