House of Tomorrow, Zero Energy Green Prefab

House of Tomorrow

This green prefab, sponsored by French architecture magazine Architectures à Vivre, was on display last weekend at the Batimat Show in Paris.  I think it’s called La Maison de Demain, which I also think is French for House of Tomorrow.  We’ll go with that as the name for now.  Their website is in French, so if anything, you can glean certain design elements from studying the images.  Some of the below information is from Google’s translation, so I hope it’s accurate. 

The home is built with three prefabricated modules and meant to show that green design can be affordable and attractive.  An important aspect of the house is the open area in the middle, which could be used as a covered patio to extend the footprint of the home into the natural environment.  Everything about the home is green, too, as far as I can tell: FSC-certified wood and siding, green label paints, low-VOC recycled carpet tiles, LED lighting, low-flow toilet, reinforced insulation, and photovoltaic panels.  You’ll also notice the living roof that provides numerous efficiency benefits (and seems to get water from the slanted roof).  In the end, the compact, modern home is very efficient.  Matter of fact, it’s nearly net zero energy consumption once the solar panels are live.  Nice.


Hood River Modern Home, Compact and Green


I was completely intrigued by this article in the New York Times about two architects’ vacation getaway, which just so happens to be green built.  And before everyone flips out saying "second homes aren’t green," I’m going to preempt that by not getting into it.  The house itself is an example of good design, small living, and green construction.  The 935 sf modern home has a living roof, FSC-certified tigerwood flooring with vegetable wax finish, water-efficient toilet, on-demand water heater, and solar tube in the bathroom, etc. 


By |November 12th, 2007|Modern architecture, Single Family, Water Efficiency|0 Comments

Project7ten, The Real Green Deal


We’re no longer in rendering stage, this is the real deal.  Project7ten is built and ready for viewing.  Actually, it’s ready for sale if: (1) it hasn’t already been sold, and (2) you’re in the market for one of the greenest, most modern homes in California.  Interestingly, this house is the first conventionally- constructed LEED Platinum home in the state.  Located at 710 E. Milwood Avenue in Venice, California, it probably doesn’t get much better than this.  Check the images.  I get this plush, radiant, rainforest vibe from the images.  So colorful and clean.  Anyone else agree?  This is definitely more contemporary than minimal, or modern even, but I really like what they’ve done.  If you watch the slide show, you’ll see a NASCAR-esque wall of sponsors.  I bet your friends don’t have that! 

Related Links:
++Project7ten Goes Platinum, Draws Celebrity Crowd
++Top Five Super Green Modern Homes


By |November 10th, 2007|LEED, Modern architecture, Nature, Single Family, Vegetation|0 Comments

Dwelling Dock, Integrating Sustainability and Living

Dwelling Dock

Matt Allert took second place in the Cascadia Region GBC‘s Emerging Green Builders Natural Talent Design Competition this year with his idea, the Dwelling Dock [pdf].  The Dwelling Dock is premised on the idea that sustainability should begin with the most basic building block of our communities: the dwelling.  It’s an attempt to fully integrate the infrastructure of the housing unit with the environment.  Although purely in concept stage, the Dwelling Dock would be prefabricated, and would include all the accoutrements we’ve come to expect in green homes:  pervious paving, recycled materials, living roof, water collection, and photovoltaic panels. 

Allert’s goals for the Dwelling Dock project include some of the following: (1) collect rainwater for re-use, (2) produce energy on-site, (3) minimize site disturbance and preserve existing site resources, (4) use local materials, and (5) integrate sustainable design with recycled, low-VOC materials.  And I’ve got to admit, I really like the design elements.  Butterfly living roof.  3-level living.  A healthy mixture of privacy and transparency.  Would you live in one?


Extreme Recycling in the Big Dig House


The Big Dig House by Single Speed Design is a testament to recycling.  More than 600,000 pounds of material were recovered from the massive Boston transit project known as the Big Dig and were reused to make this 3,400 square foot house.  Temporary road sections (formerly used as access ramps for a bridge), support beams that shored up a slurry wall, and other pieces were saved from being sent to a landfill and instead became the bones of this unique home.


By |November 5th, 2007|Materials, Modern architecture, Recycled, Single Family|14 Comments

[Video] The Natural House, Net Zero Energy Home

I was excited to get an email this morning regarding the pilot episode of The Natural House, which is produced by Distant Planet Media.  The beginning of the video takes us through the Kelly Woodford Mountain Retreat in Oregon, a home we talked about previously.  It’s a net zero energy home, creating as much energy as it uses.  The producers were kind enough to allow embedding on this one, so watch and share away!

By |November 3rd, 2007|Materials, Single Family|0 Comments