Articles - Vegetation RSS Feed

Texas Water IQ Quiz + Pledge – It's the Least You Can Do!

Water_iq_logo It’s official, I’m a water genius.  I had a hard time with the question on the lawn mower, but other than that, I scored a near perfect 11/12, which means I have a water IQ of 165.  That’s certifiable water genius status.  I’m joking a little, but water is a serious thing.  Growing up, I used to think water was free, but the reality is all too different.  If you’ve ever read the book Dune, by Frank Herbert, you can imagine how life is with a water shortage.  By the way, I don’t think I could wear one of those suits!  Anyway, I live in Texas because it’s big and has many things in abundance, but we need to keep it that way…let’s get serious about our water supply and act collectively. 

There’s something easy that we can all do:  go to www.waterIQ.org, take the Water IQ quiz and make the water IQ pledge.  By doing so, you pledge to reduce water consumption by 5%, water your lawn only once per week, fix all leaks, raise the blade on your lawn mower to 3 inches, operate your sprinkler system manually, and forgo watering from 10 a.m to 6 p.m.  These are simple, but necessary, steps to take.  Our individual pledge, when combined with the collective efforts of other Texans, will help to keep water available in drought or sans drought.  It’s the least we can do. 

Extra Links:
Save Dallas Water [Enlish or Spanish]
Texas Water Matters

Skyscraper Sunday: Dallas Condo Tower, Azure, Going Green

Azure_dallas_image Absolute Architectural Splendor.  There’s a little bit of green development in Dallas, but we can do more to catch up to other progressive cities such as Portland + Austin.  Azure, a 375-foot condo in Dallas being developed by the innovative Gabriel Barbier-Mueller of Harwood International (+ Westback Projects Corporation), is Dallas’ first foray into LEED, green living, as far as residential condo development is concerned.  Azure is on track to receive the LEED gold certification from the USGBC, but it is trying to get platinum.  Really, all that matters is that this place will be green + modern. 

Architectural design is by James KM Cheng Architects Inc., interior design by Gensler and Lauren Rottet, FAIA, and external landscaping by SWA Group.  As far as sustainable building is concerned, here’s what I know so far:  high-performance engineered window system with clear anodized aluminum framing and insulated clear double glazing with Low-E coating; energy efficient lighting meeting National Energy Code; LEED certified building envelope and heating/air conditioning; and high-quality roller/motorized shading system made of sun control fabric. 

Azure_rendering Azure_interior Azure_side_rendering

Some amenities include Miele and Sub-Zero appliances and professionally designed interiors.  Owners will also have access to the spa, his/her sauna, state-of-the-art exercise facilities, private garage (refered to as "G2"), 17 seat theater, garden terrace and pool, boardroom, and library with a fireplace.  What this means is that Azure will be a 31 story, 202 unit, $400,000 – $4.2 M per-unit superstar.  Seriously.  And I know it’s well over 65% pre-sold, so those that are interested will need to jump on it quick.  It should be complete in Spring 2007. 

Extra Links:
Azure Website [www.azureliving.com]
The Allure of Azure [Jim Schutze - Observor]
Azure Live Construction Camera
Harwood International Website
Westbank Projects Corporation Website

Ketchum, Idaho Contemporary Residence with a Lighter Shade of Green

Snow_image There was a home in Architectural Digest that really caught my eye.  Maybe it’s because the Roger Wade images perfectly captured how the house blends into the hilly landscape of Ketchum, Idaho.  I don’t know…maybe I was just intrigued by the hoops the architect Jim McLaughlin had to go through just to get the darn thing built.  The architect had height restrictions to deal with and still managed to squeeze in 9,000 square feet of space.  The interesting thing about this house is that it has a contempory-interior, modern-exterior, traditional home-type feel to it.  I mean, it doesn’t look like one of the prefabs I like to talk about, but it’s extremely contemporary. 

Roger_wade_interior_kitchen Roger_wade_interior_stairs

They excavated 25 feet into the hill and built from within the rock to make the house seem like it’s flowing from the rocks.  The architect designed the home to use local Montana stone on the facade and accented that with reclaimed beams inside.  With all the windows, the builder (Gary Storey) and architect found a way to incorporate motorized sunshades the shoot up from the floor to the top of the windows.  What that does, in turn, is blur the boundaries between the interior and exterior and provide an effective method to maximize the balance between natural light and shading. 

Roger_wade_driveway_view Roger_wade_bedroom_view Roger_wade_back_porch

While I know some of my devoted readers will scream because this place has a 9,000 sq.ft. footprint and doesn’t really use alternative energy, I think the house illustrates a lighter shade of green.  The place looks good and uses local materials and reclaimed wood.  That’s a start. 

As far as the interior is concerned, the kitchen has zinc counters and wenge-wood cabinets with white-bronze inlay.  Designed by Libby Brost, a former chef and restaurant owner, she recently sold her restaurant to concentrate on design.  She designed the kitchen so that it didn’t necessarily look like a full-blown kitchen.  It’s there, but it blends into the other room.  And that goes the same with the other rooms.  I think it’s a handsome place. 

Extra Links:
Roger Wade Photography
Architectural Digest [article not online]
McLaughlin Architects

Green Building Throwback: Landscaping Common Sense

Colonial_home I was reading an article somewhere that said one could increase a home’s value by planting trees and properly landscaping the grounds.  Ostensibly, there are two reasons for this:  first, trees and landscaping can make a house look good, and second, they take time and care to grow, so mature landscaping illustrates the care a homeowner gives to their residence.  (Aside: this reason is akin to buying a 3 year-old vehicle from a retired person that only put 15,000 miles on it and stored it in the garage.)  But if we pay attention to history, there is a third reason–one that affects a home’s livability and monthly costs.  Proper landscaping can provide cooling for the interior. 

I came across this old Philadelphia, Pennsylvania statute from about 1672 that I think applies: 

Springfield_colonial_homeEvery owner or inhabitant of any and every house in Philadelphia, Newcastle and Chester shall plant one or more tree or trees, viz., pines, unbearing mulberries, water poplars, lime or other shady and wholesome trees before the door of his, her or their house and houses, not exceeding eight feet from the front of the house, and preserving the same, to the end that the said town may be well shaded from the violence of the sun in the heat of summer and thereby rendered more healthy

We’re talking about a time when people didn’t have air conditioning or electricity.  Sure, they lived differently and had different lifestyles, but I like to think they wanted to stay cool when they could.  So landscaping can have a dramatic effect on the interior temperature of your home.  Well-shaded homes requires less air conditioning and that cuts back on your electricity/energy bills.  Proper landscape planning will allow you to maximize natural light and minimize violent sun rays.  And this is important to healthy home living. 

Page 15 of 15« First...10«1112131415


Popular Topics on Jetson Green