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Project7ten, The Real Green Deal


We’re no longer in rendering stage, this is the real deal.  Project7ten is built and ready for viewing.  Actually, it’s ready for sale if: (1) it hasn’t already been sold, and (2) you’re in the market for one of the greenest, most modern homes in California.  Interestingly, this house is the first conventionally- constructed LEED Platinum home in the state.  Located at 710 E. Milwood Avenue in Venice, California, it probably doesn’t get much better than this.  Check the images.  I get this plush, radiant, rainforest vibe from the images.  So colorful and clean.  Anyone else agree?  This is definitely more contemporary than minimal, or modern even, but I really like what they’ve done.  If you watch the slide show, you’ll see a NASCAR-esque wall of sponsors.  I bet your friends don’t have that! 

Related Links:
++Project7ten Goes Platinum, Draws Celebrity Crowd
++Top Five Super Green Modern Homes

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Top-10 Green Building Products 2007 [BuildingGreen]

SunEye from Solmetric

Well, it’s that time again and BuildingGreen, a company that also publishes the GreenSpec Directory, today announced their list of Top-10 Green Building Products.  It’s not so much that these products are better than everything else on the market, although they may be better, it’s that they’re cool additions to the GreenSpec Directory over the last year or so.  Most of the following ten products have multiple environmental attributes, but here’s a slim breakdown:  4 save energy, 2 save water, 3 are made of green materials, 1 helps situate solar power, and 2 avoid hazardous manufacturing/disposal of materials.  Without further ado:

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Urban Rio, Panama's First Affordable Green Container Project

Urban Rio

UPDATE 3/16/09Urban Core International has gone dark.  The website was shut down.  If you have any concerns, feel free to contact us

Aaron Newman, founder and managing partner of Urban Core International, sent me the details of his latest project, Urban Rio.  Specifically, Urban Rio is a product of Urban Core's prefab and container division called Envision Prefab.  It's easy on the eyes, to say the least, and just so happens to be the first sustainable, affordable, container project in Panama. 

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William McDonough Launches Blog, C2C Community

C2c William McDonough and Michael Braumgart, founders of MBDC and authors of the popular Cradle to Cradle book, just announced the launch of their new blog, the Cradle to Cradle Community Blog.  The blog looks to be authored authentically by the experts themselves, so we won’t have to chase after old Bioneers videos on Youtube just to get some wit and wisdom from McDonough himself.  I can’t wait to read this, although it would be nice to have an RSS reminder every now and then.  Simultaneously, they’ve announced the creation of the Cradle to Cradle Community Forum.  The forum has subcategories for discussions on Cradle to Cradle Design, Innovative Materials, Closing Loops, and Cradle to Cradle Certification.  There’s free and subscription levels within the forum and it looks like premium members get to participate in live chats.  Fair enough.

Dwelling Dock, Integrating Sustainability and Living

Dwelling Dock

Matt Allert took second place in the Cascadia Region GBC‘s Emerging Green Builders Natural Talent Design Competition this year with his idea, the Dwelling Dock [pdf].  The Dwelling Dock is premised on the idea that sustainability should begin with the most basic building block of our communities: the dwelling.  It’s an attempt to fully integrate the infrastructure of the housing unit with the environment.  Although purely in concept stage, the Dwelling Dock would be prefabricated, and would include all the accoutrements we’ve come to expect in green homes:  pervious paving, recycled materials, living roof, water collection, and photovoltaic panels. 

Allert’s goals for the Dwelling Dock project include some of the following: (1) collect rainwater for re-use, (2) produce energy on-site, (3) minimize site disturbance and preserve existing site resources, (4) use local materials, and (5) integrate sustainable design with recycled, low-VOC materials.  And I’ve got to admit, I really like the design elements.  Butterfly living roof.  3-level living.  A healthy mixture of privacy and transparency.  Would you live in one?

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Extreme Recycling in the Big Dig House


The Big Dig House by Single Speed Design is a testament to recycling.  More than 600,000 pounds of material were recovered from the massive Boston transit project known as the Big Dig and were reused to make this 3,400 square foot house.  Temporary road sections (formerly used as access ramps for a bridge), support beams that shored up a slurry wall, and other pieces were saved from being sent to a landfill and instead became the bones of this unique home.

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