Articles - Products RSS Feed

Green Office: Steelcase Think Chair–"the Chair with a Brain + a Conscience"

Think_green_office My first installment to the "Green Office" segment is about the office chair.  I walked into a friend’s downtown office (a lawyer) and he had some beat up, patchy furniture inside.  I asked him what the deal was and he responded that it was all the firm provided.  That gets me, big-time.  For all you professionals out there, especially young professionals, your job is your domain and if the bossman isn’t providing it, do it yourself.  My credo, dress and office like the person who’s job you want to have.  So I prefer CEO-style all the way.  If clients come in my office, they’ll see CEO-style.  Compare that to the cubicle next door and they’ll form an impression about your position in the firm.  You’ve got to be a rainmaker, so this is all about looking the part. 

As far as office chairs go, there seems to be a race to ergonomics–"Ooh, nice, is that so and so’s chair?"  "Did corporate get that for ya?"  "How much does one of those run?"  You get the drift.  Steelcase, Inc. makes this entire process very easy, actually, modern + green easy.  They have two chairs that are Cradle to Cradle™ Certified Silver:  Think™ + Leap®.  I’m going to focus on Think.  Think also received the BusinessWeek 2006 Gold IDEA award, IIDEX Sustainable Design Gold award, NeoCon Editor’s Choice Award, and the Red Dot Award for Product Design (Germany).  But forget accolades, here’s where sustainability meets the chair. 

Think_white Think_downward Think_white_office

First, cradle to cradle for this chair means the company considered what goes into the chair, how it is made, and what happens to the chair when it is no longer a chair.  The chair is designed to be highly recyclable + safe for environmental health.  Second, the chair is up to 99% recyclable by weight + up to 44% recycled content.  Third, disassembly takes about 5 minutes and Steelcase has set up the structure for customers to participate in recycling of their used chair.  Fourth, the chair is Greenguard Indoor Air Quality Certified.  But if this is too green for you, there’s more. 

Think is comfortable too.  It has the adjustable arms, pneumatic seat height, and innovative back "flexors" that track and respond fluidly to your natural weight and movements.  So not only is this chair environmentally conscious, it’s smart, too.  I think an added benefit to the chair is that one can order the thing online and have it shipped FedEx ground-style for free.  So, if you’re tired of that standard office stuff and want to make a change, I’d get one of these Steelcase chairs shipped straight to the office. 

Extra Links:
Think Chair Mini-site [Steelcase]
Steelcase Online Store
MBDC Cradle to Cradle Certification

Ketchum, Idaho Contemporary Residence with a Lighter Shade of Green

Snow_image There was a home in Architectural Digest that really caught my eye.  Maybe it’s because the Roger Wade images perfectly captured how the house blends into the hilly landscape of Ketchum, Idaho.  I don’t know…maybe I was just intrigued by the hoops the architect Jim McLaughlin had to go through just to get the darn thing built.  The architect had height restrictions to deal with and still managed to squeeze in 9,000 square feet of space.  The interesting thing about this house is that it has a contempory-interior, modern-exterior, traditional home-type feel to it.  I mean, it doesn’t look like one of the prefabs I like to talk about, but it’s extremely contemporary. 

Roger_wade_interior_kitchen Roger_wade_interior_stairs

They excavated 25 feet into the hill and built from within the rock to make the house seem like it’s flowing from the rocks.  The architect designed the home to use local Montana stone on the facade and accented that with reclaimed beams inside.  With all the windows, the builder (Gary Storey) and architect found a way to incorporate motorized sunshades the shoot up from the floor to the top of the windows.  What that does, in turn, is blur the boundaries between the interior and exterior and provide an effective method to maximize the balance between natural light and shading. 

Roger_wade_driveway_view Roger_wade_bedroom_view Roger_wade_back_porch

While I know some of my devoted readers will scream because this place has a 9,000 sq.ft. footprint and doesn’t really use alternative energy, I think the house illustrates a lighter shade of green.  The place looks good and uses local materials and reclaimed wood.  That’s a start. 

As far as the interior is concerned, the kitchen has zinc counters and wenge-wood cabinets with white-bronze inlay.  Designed by Libby Brost, a former chef and restaurant owner, she recently sold her restaurant to concentrate on design.  She designed the kitchen so that it didn’t necessarily look like a full-blown kitchen.  It’s there, but it blends into the other room.  And that goes the same with the other rooms.  I think it’s a handsome place. 

Extra Links:
Roger Wade Photography
Architectural Digest [article not online]
McLaughlin Architects

There's a New Prefab in Town: Michelle Kaufmann Designs + mkSolaire

Mksolaire If you haven’t noticed, there’s a new prefab in town.  But if you’ve been following the modern prefab movement, you’ll recognize this newest installment comes from an experienced architect:  Michelle Kaufann Designs.  MKD is behind the glidehouse and sunset breezehouse prefabs that have become the talk in modern + sustainable building circles.  But these aren’t just prefab concepts or designs.  Recently, MKD finished building the first U.S. factory dedicated to sustainable, modular custom homes (www.mkConstructs.com).  This Washington (state) factory is wholly-owned by MKD and will serve California, Washington, Oregon, and Hawaii. 

Solaire_interior The mkSolaire is an open, loft-like home designed for healthy, green living in the urban context.  The architecturally designed roof and windows allow a perfect mixture of air and light to enter the home.  Initial design to completion lead time is roughly 8-14 months, which varies depending on a variety of factors specific to your design and location.  Some of the things that will be available include solar panel roofing, geothermal system, wind generator system, hybrid system, icynene insulation, bamboo or reclaimed wood flooring, recycled paper countertops, recycled glass countertops, on-demand water heaters, water-saving dual-flush toilets, non-toxic paints, and formaldehyde-free cabinetry, etc. 

Solaire_roofSolaire_18  Solaire_17

Because the mkSolaire is built from a modular system, there are endless possibilities as far as layouts and floorplans.  The website has 5+ floorplan options, but it looks like those can be further customized.  And if you’re really interested in taking the plunge, MKD has tried to take the sting out of prefab costing by explaining how it all works.  This stuff isn’t cheap:  factory costs ($150-175 square foot), transportation + installation ($3,000 – $8,000 per module), site costs (depends on location), and miscellaneous costs (permit fees, architectural and engineering fees, sales tax for some states, appliance costs, add-on costs, etc.).  That said, homes do come with high-end Kohler  and Hansgrohe fixtures, Anderson windows + doors, and slate-tile flooring.

I could go on and on, so feel free to visit their site and see if this looks like something you’re interested in.  As far as modern + green custom architectural design is concerned, this is about as good an option as they come.  Source via Linton + Yahoo Finance

Green Building Throwback: Landscaping Common Sense

Colonial_home I was reading an article somewhere that said one could increase a home’s value by planting trees and properly landscaping the grounds.  Ostensibly, there are two reasons for this:  first, trees and landscaping can make a house look good, and second, they take time and care to grow, so mature landscaping illustrates the care a homeowner gives to their residence.  (Aside: this reason is akin to buying a 3 year-old vehicle from a retired person that only put 15,000 miles on it and stored it in the garage.)  But if we pay attention to history, there is a third reason–one that affects a home’s livability and monthly costs.  Proper landscaping can provide cooling for the interior. 

I came across this old Philadelphia, Pennsylvania statute from about 1672 that I think applies: 

Springfield_colonial_homeEvery owner or inhabitant of any and every house in Philadelphia, Newcastle and Chester shall plant one or more tree or trees, viz., pines, unbearing mulberries, water poplars, lime or other shady and wholesome trees before the door of his, her or their house and houses, not exceeding eight feet from the front of the house, and preserving the same, to the end that the said town may be well shaded from the violence of the sun in the heat of summer and thereby rendered more healthy

We’re talking about a time when people didn’t have air conditioning or electricity.  Sure, they lived differently and had different lifestyles, but I like to think they wanted to stay cool when they could.  So landscaping can have a dramatic effect on the interior temperature of your home.  Well-shaded homes requires less air conditioning and that cuts back on your electricity/energy bills.  Proper landscape planning will allow you to maximize natural light and minimize violent sun rays.  And this is important to healthy home living. 

Contemporary Furniture: Going Green with Exceptionally Designed Bicycle Parts

S2_modulus_diningoffice_chair This isn’t just some ordinary, run-of-the-mill furniture, slapped together with no thought for the environment, comfort, or design.  Andy Gregg founded Bike Furniture Design in the 90s with the seminal, original bike chair.  Since then, his collection has grown to include bar stools, high-quality tables, loveseats, and more chairs.  While his furniture is made primarily from recycled steel and aluminum bicycle rims, handlebars, and frames, his collection has grown to include parts from other transportation industries such as trains and planes. 

Again, this stuff isn’t slapped together, it’s pretty darn close to artwork.  Upholstery options include leather, rubber, cork, clear + colored acrylic, and vinyl.  And his business is starting to reach a tipping point.  In 2004, revenue picked up enough to allow Gregg to focus on the business.  Growing demand has pushed him to explore the use of new materials, and he keeps coming up with great pieces.  This can be attributed to his art and mechanics background.  So if you have an idea in mind, I’m sure he’d be able to crank it out (no pun intended). 

S2_swivel_barstool_1Milano_lounge_chair_1S2_bar_table

Extra Links:
Fortune Small Business Article
Silicon Valley’s The Wave Magazine Article
HGTV "I Want That!" Episode #313

1920s San Antonio Industrial Compound Converted into Eco + Modern Residence

Lakeflato_architects_home Every project is different and depending on the circumstances, one will have a bevy of options to choose from to move forward with a green plan.  Some projects need to be torn down.  Some projects can be renovated and greened.  It depends on the economics, politics, and persuasions of all parties involved.  In this case, San Antonio architects, Lake/Flato, decided to reuse this industrial compound’s existing footprint to renovate the place into a green + modern residence, otherwise known as the Dog Team Too Loft + Studio. 

The house is well-positioned to receive natural light, so the energy requirements for lighting are minimal.  The architects used fritted panes for windows, which is glass covered with tons of tiny ceramic dots that let in light and maintain a semblance of privacy.  The glass is similar to using something like light-transmitting blinds because it allows lower-intensity light into the interior, but it also reduces the heat gain, which translates into savings for not having to use the A/C as much. 

Lakeflato_stairs Lakeflato_living_room_2 Lakeflato_saw_tooth_2

The original roof was lost due to a fire, so the saw-tooth roof visible in the above picture covers the entire residence.  Some of the interior walls are plaster, and their high sand content keeps the indoor air cool.  The architects also used various cheap, but creative, items to finish out the interior.  They used galvanized stair treads ($3 each) and treated the floor with crankcase oil from a nearby lube shop.  The interior dining room window was scrap from another project that the firm was doing, so it was put to perfect re-use.  The Lake/Flato architects definitely prove that re-use can be the perfect option when deciding what to do with that run down place.  Source via Metropolitan Home

Page 102 of 103« First...708090«99100101102103»


Popular Topics on Jetson Green