• exteriorrendering

Jellyfish House, Future Sustainable Structures [Video]

I watched this video of the Jellyfish House by architects Lisa Iwamoto and Craig Scott, and needless to say, I was kind of blown away.  It’s quite compelling to watch, but at the same level, it’s complicated.  I can’t say I understand everything that’s going on but I like it.  Jellyfish are responsive to the environment around them, so like jellyfish, one concept with this house is that water is filtered and harvested through the actual structure of the home.  The structure uses UV light filtration, which could come down in price in the future, and titanium dioxide, which is now used for self-cleaning glass in tall skyscrapers.  This concept prototype for the future of sustainable living was designed (hypothetically) for Treasure Island, a decommissioned military base in San Francisco Bay with toxic top soil. 


  • topfive

Top Five Super Green Modern Homes

A home doesn’t need to be modern to be green, but I like the modern ones.  I’d love to see entire neighborhoods of modern green homes.  I like the idea of changing the way we perceive the single-family home, too.  Denser neighborhoods?  Sure.  Residential wind turbines?  Definitely.  Solar on the roof?  You bet.  But right now, we’re still in the early stages of recognizing legitimate green homes.


By |August 20th, 2007|Categories: LEED, Modern architecture, Prefab|Tags: , , |0 Comments
  • jg_site_stats_20070820

Major Milestones for Jetson Green

This is just a quick administrative post on the status of Jetson Green.  I’m pleased to announce that Jetson Green has come upon two major milestones:  (1) passing the 100,000 unique visitors threshold + (2) passing the one year mark in existence.  As another interesting note, this post is number 400 for Jetson Green.  I’m proud of these achievements, but I want to thank the readers of Jetson Green.  We’re currently hovering around 900 readers in the feed, so this website is becoming considerable in reach.  As you can see from the graph below, it just keeps growing and improving.  I think these numbers are incredible, especially because this is a one-person endeavor and we haven’t hit the front page of digg (or similar).


By |August 20th, 2007|Categories: News|Tags: |0 Comments
  • pl_home_f

Windermere West – Chicago Slanting Windows (S2)

Wired has an interesting story about a new 26-story tower soon to be built in Chicago’s Hyde Park called Windermere West.  The building was designed by Jeanne Gang, with a little help from Arup.  […]

By |August 19th, 2007|Categories: Energy Efficiency, Modern architecture, Skyscraper|0 Comments
  • other_front

Powerfully Small and Green Ideabox

"It's like a loft you can take anywhere."  Ideabox offers a pretty cool product in the modern, prefabricated housing industry.  Ideabox emphasizes good design, not square footage, and they make it easy to do.  With Ideabox, you're going to get the entire package right to your site.  There's one day to install it, one day to build the deck, and that's about it.  Depending on your site, all you really need to do is set up the water, power, septic, and sewer systems.  You can even go wireless with the turnkey solar system package, too. 


By |August 18th, 2007|Categories: Energy Efficiency, Modern architecture, Prefab, Single Family|Tags: , |0 Comments
  • wedgesink

VitraStone Eco-Friendly Sinks + Surfaces

I’m excited about this post.  When it comes to surface materials, there’s a lot out there, and I’ve blogged about a few companies that have good products.  Concrete countertops appear on house flipping-type shows every now and then, so I thought it was time we all got to know VitraStone.  VitraStone products are made from 70-85% recycled content (post consumer & post industrial) such as recycled glass and fly ash blended with a proprietary mix of ceramic cement.  Products in the VitraStone line up include vessel sinks, sink tops, countertop systems, back splash, floor tiles, wall cladding, and furniture and accessories.  VitraStone is strong, too.  Scratch and chip resistant.  Freeze/thaw cycle resistant.  Mold resistant.  VitraStone products come in a variety of colors (as you will see below) for interior and exterior applications.  No off-gassing here. 

Couple cool things about VitraStone:  (1) you may get LEED credits for using these materials, and (2) VitraStone offers free design services to create 3-dimensional layouts for client approvals (or they’ll work directly with architectural specifications).  Matter of fact, the green building store here in Salt Lake City carries VitraStone, so maybe I can push the old landlord into a green kitchen renovation?  Any thoughts …


By |August 18th, 2007|Categories: Gadgets, LEED, Materials, Modern design, Recycled|Tags: |0 Comments

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