Home(scale) Brings Innovation to Modern Green Project for Philly

I’ve been sitting on details of the newest green development in Philly and I just can’t hold it any longer.  Actually, CEO Steven Nebel shot me an email and said it was okay to use the renderings.  The development is called High Street Development, and it’s expected to be a net zero energy, mixed use community.  High Street Development will have modern residential units ranging in size from 1000 to 2100 sf.  Recently, the project was presented to the community and enthusiastically received, which I think is due to the project’s innate approachability and sustainability.  Let me explain that. 

The developer, home(scale), has three primary goals in mind with this project: (1) offer a project with the sophistication of something like the Hearst Building in NYC, (2) make it at a price point that is affordable to an average middle-class consumer, and (3) provide high-class, superior amenities that look incredible.  To do this, you have to be smart and resourceful–it takes serious effort and experience to create an approachable product without all the cost overruns.  Currently, home(scale) is working with Silpa Inc., an environmental consultancy, to provide the best systems, whether that’s shared geothermal and solar systems with fully automated controls, or otherwise.  There’s also going to be a car sharing program for residents.  But these are just a few of the details being finalized.  Expect to see High Street Development completed sometime late winter or spring 2008.  More images below. 

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By |August 1st, 2007|Categories: Modern architecture, Solar|Tags: , |0 Comments

Human Bones + Nanoengineering = Green Concrete?

The following post may seem a little esoteric, if not absolutely dry, but don’t be intimidated.  Bear with me a second as the idea opens up towards the end of this article.  Every year, roughly 1.89 billion tons of cement (the main component of concrete) are manufactured.  Cement accounts for about 7-8% of all human-generated CO2 emissions (a main ingredient in the recipe for climate change).  Here’s what happens: cement is made by burning fossil fuels to heat a limestone and clay powder to 1500 °C.  Then, the resulting cement powder is mixed with water and gravel and the invested energy in the powder is released into chemical bonds that form calcium silicate hydrates.  Those calcium silicate hydrates bind the gravel to create concrete. 

So, the idea goes, human bone could show us how to manufacture concrete with less CO2 emissions.  Human bone achieves a similar packing density to concrete at the nanoscale, but with human bone, this packing density is achieved at body temperature with no extra release of CO2.  Stated otherwise, bone strength is achieved naturally without having to heat powder at a high temperature, and thus, without the CO2 release.  The problem is, however, the hardening of apatite minerals in the bone takes a long time.  Say, a month or more. 

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By |August 1st, 2007|Categories: Gadgets, Materials, News|Tags: |0 Comments

The Orb Steps Up for a Younger Generation

This is incredible.  It would be nice if someone here in the U.S. would put something like THE ORB into production.  According to the company’s website, The Orb "is a new generation of mobile structures created specifically to fire the imagination of a younger, style conscious generation.  It has been designed to appeal across three distinct markets: commercial show units, holiday park homes and adaptable home offices.  Built to a standard far beyond that of comparable structures using marine technology, it is both incredibly durable, lightweight and transportable."  Appeal?  Done. 

Now, the website reveals some details on how The Orb is built (and Treehugger suggests that using GRP may not be that green), but I think one could use green materials to get it built.  Plus, you could toss up a few solar panels on a separate pole and provide renewable energy for it too.  Another positive aspect of The Orb is that it’s small by design, but chances are, this will not be a primary dwelling, so size is not an issue.  Regardless, I dig it and think it could be used in a variety of applications.  Plus, it’s kind of similar to Dasparkhotel (and we know that’s been successful).  More images below.  Via CubeMe. 

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By |July 31st, 2007|Categories: Materials, Modern architecture, Prefab|Tags: , |0 Comments

Hamiltons Castle House Will Blow Your Top Off (S2)

This incredible design scheme is Castle House by Hamiltons of London.  Located at Elephant and Castle, the project will have two buildings: the 43 story tower with 3 nine meter diameter wind turbines at the top and the 5 story pavilion building on the side.  I’m not really sure what stage of development the project is in, but it was supposed to start in mid- to late-2006.  With completion projected for 2009, the residential project is targeting an "excellent" rating under the EcoHomes certification system.  When complete, Castle House will have 310 apartments comprising 247,500 sf and retail units on the ground level.  More images and modeling below the jump.  Via WAN + WAN. 

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By |July 29th, 2007|Categories: Gadgets, Nature, Skyscraper, Wind|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Green Roofs, Cleantech Investments, Monster Homes + Stellar LEED Returns (WIR)

Rooftop vegetation and gardens are catching on–though there are still many questions about how and when to apply the technique.  Cleantech venture capital investments are small but growing.  Monster Homes: […]

By |July 28th, 2007|Categories: Gadgets, LEED, News, Week in Review|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Stanford Yang & Yamazaki Green Building Coming Along Nicely

The Jerry Yang and Akiko Yamazaki Environment and Energy Building is coming along nicely.  Yang is the co-founder of Yahoo! and Yamazaki is a director of the Wildlife Conservation Network in Los Altos.  Needless to say, the powerful couple takes pride in their alma mater and the environment.  But back to the building.  Dubbed the Y2E2 Building, this $120 M building will be quite the eco-structure once completed.  Funded in part by a $50 million grant by Yang and Yamazaki, Y2E2 is expected to use 50% less energy and roughly 90% water of a traditional building of similar size.  Coming in at roughly 166,000 sf, Y2E2 is expected to be complete near the end of this year, say November or December-ish, and will become the future home for the Woods Institute for the Environment (and a couple other groups).  Y2E2 is located at Via Ortega and Panama Street.   Another image below the jump. 

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By |July 27th, 2007|Categories: Energy Efficiency, News|Tags: , |0 Comments
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