Major Milestones for Jetson Green

This is just a quick administrative post on the status of Jetson Green.  I’m pleased to announce that Jetson Green has come upon two major milestones:  (1) passing the 100,000 unique visitors threshold + (2) passing the one year mark in existence.  As another interesting note, this post is number 400 for Jetson Green.  I’m proud of these achievements, but I want to thank the readers of Jetson Green.  We’re currently hovering around 900 readers in the feed, so this website is becoming considerable in reach.  As you can see from the graph below, it just keeps growing and improving.  I think these numbers are incredible, especially because this is a one-person endeavor and we haven’t hit the front page of digg (or similar).

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By |August 20th, 2007|Categories: News|Tags: |0 Comments

Windermere West – Chicago Slanting Windows (S2)

Wired has an interesting story about a new 26-story tower soon to be built in Chicago’s Hyde Park called Windermere West.  The building was designed by Jeanne Gang, with a little help from Arup.  […]

By |August 19th, 2007|Categories: Energy Efficiency, Modern architecture, Skyscraper|0 Comments

Powerfully Small and Green Ideabox

"It's like a loft you can take anywhere."  Ideabox offers a pretty cool product in the modern, prefabricated housing industry.  Ideabox emphasizes good design, not square footage, and they make it easy to do.  With Ideabox, you're going to get the entire package right to your site.  There's one day to install it, one day to build the deck, and that's about it.  Depending on your site, all you really need to do is set up the water, power, septic, and sewer systems.  You can even go wireless with the turnkey solar system package, too. 

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By |August 18th, 2007|Categories: Energy Efficiency, Modern architecture, Prefab, Single Family|Tags: , |0 Comments

VitraStone Eco-Friendly Sinks + Surfaces

I’m excited about this post.  When it comes to surface materials, there’s a lot out there, and I’ve blogged about a few companies that have good products.  Concrete countertops appear on house flipping-type shows every now and then, so I thought it was time we all got to know VitraStone.  VitraStone products are made from 70-85% recycled content (post consumer & post industrial) such as recycled glass and fly ash blended with a proprietary mix of ceramic cement.  Products in the VitraStone line up include vessel sinks, sink tops, countertop systems, back splash, floor tiles, wall cladding, and furniture and accessories.  VitraStone is strong, too.  Scratch and chip resistant.  Freeze/thaw cycle resistant.  Mold resistant.  VitraStone products come in a variety of colors (as you will see below) for interior and exterior applications.  No off-gassing here. 

Couple cool things about VitraStone:  (1) you may get LEED credits for using these materials, and (2) VitraStone offers free design services to create 3-dimensional layouts for client approvals (or they’ll work directly with architectural specifications).  Matter of fact, the green building store here in Salt Lake City carries VitraStone, so maybe I can push the old landlord into a green kitchen renovation?  Any thoughts …

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By |August 18th, 2007|Categories: Gadgets, LEED, Materials, Modern design, Recycled|Tags: |0 Comments

Home Design + Construction, Consumer Environmentalism + Corporate Sustainability (WIR)

Why is new housing so big and lousy?  Why do builders build these homes?  Despite unwavering focus by the media, government and business, "going green" is only of moderate concern to most […]

By |August 18th, 2007|Categories: News, Week in Review|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Boulder's Green Hickory Home by VaST

This green home was built in 2003, so it’s not anything new in particular, but I wanted to share some of the green concepts the homeowners worked through during process of building it.  First, the owners, Brandy LeMae + Joseph Vigil, purchased an odd-shaped lot near a well-traveled road for $157k.  It was rather cheap, with some lots in Boulder costing nearly $400k, so the design would have to solve the noise and space problem.  Second, they wanted a green home on a budget.  In the end, they were able to build the Hickory House for about $91 psf.  There’s an excellent article from Dwell about their process, but I’m going to explain a little below.

The owners raved about structural insulated panels, or SIPs, which went up quickly, were cut to size, allowed for minimal waste, and helped to defray the costs of the project.  They also used Forbo natural linoleum countertops, radiant heating in the concrete floors, and denim by-product cotton insulation.  LeMae + Vigil tried to keep the design simple — the more complicated the design is, the less money there is to go towards green things (check out VaST’s 3 Design Strategies to Build Green + Save Money).  Vigil also designed a foot-wide concrete-block wall stuffed with foam insulation for the west side of the house.  By doing this, he was able to block out noise from the road and provide shading for the home.  They finished up with some interior design straight from IKEA and were happy with the final product.  Looks great from this angle.  More images below. 

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By |August 16th, 2007|Categories: Land Use, Materials, Modern architecture|Tags: |0 Comments
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