Platinum USGBC, Steelcase's IAQ, Energy Star Hits NM + CoStar Group (WIR)

Week in Review
  1. USGBC’s New D.C. Headquarters Go Platinum – The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) can now hold itself out as an example of what green building is all about. The USGBC has a 22,000 square-foot office suite in the Gold Certified Service Employees International Union Building (LEED-NC). What’s incredible is that the USGBC’s office suite just obtained LEED Platinum for Commercial Interiors (LEED-CI). So the building is gold on the outside and platinum on the inside.
  2. Steelcase Products Awarded Indoor Advantage Certifications for Low Emissions – Steelcase Inc. (NYSE: SCS), a global office environments manufacturer, today announced that over 20 of its product lines have received Indoor Advantage(TM) certifications from Scientific Certification Systems (SCS), an independent third-party certifier.
  3. EPA Gives Six NM Buildings Energy Star Ratings – Six buildings in New Mexico have earned an Energy Star rating from the EPA for cutting their energy bills and greenhouse gas emissions.  The buildings encompass more than 1.9 million square feet and saved an estimated $350,000 annually in lower energy bills. They also prevented more than 5 million pounds of greenhouse gas emissions, equal to the emissions of more than 400 vehicles.
  4. CoStar Group Promotes Energy Efficiency, Sustainable Green Buildings by Adding Energy Star Rating to Commercial Properties in its Database – CoStar Group, Inc. (Nasdaq: CSGP) announced that it will begin adding the ENERGY STAR rating–the most recognized national metric for evaluating building energy efficiency–to properties in its massive online database, which currently contains more than 2 million researched and verified commercial properties of all classes and types.

Rocio Romero's LV Home (F2)

Click for more information on the LV Home by Rocio Romero, which is a 1,150 square-foot prefab with a living room, dining room, kitchen, 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, and closets–all starting at $33,900.

"F2" is short for "Flickr Friday," a weekly short posted on Friday with an image from Flickr and a quick description.  Feel free to email me your F2 ideas.

Video: Construction 2.0 + CleverHomes

[Run time: 54:30 min.]  I was reading the Scobleizer and found a fairly substantial video interview with Toby Long, founder of the San Francisco-based, design-build firm CleverHomes.  Cleverhomes is one of those companies swimming upstream in a construction river of anti-progress, anti-innovation, and staunch traditionalism.  I love the Scoble laugh, seriously, it makes the interview pretty good.  Long talks about the interface of technology + construction, or what I’m calling Construction 2.0, with an added dimension of sustainability.  Going forward, the environmental consequences associated with construction need to be figured into a given project’s analysis.  He also mentions structural insulated panels (SIPs), building information modeling (BIM), sustainability, and modern vernacular.  Get past the beginning and give it go…

Intangible Drivers of the Green Building Movement

Green_roof_house Some cities require LEED or green buildings.  Some cities fast track the permitting process for green buildings.  Some cities provide tax incentives or some sort of creative financing for green buildings.  Nevertheless, developers say the economics of green buildings don’t work–they say the government needs to do more to support green buildings.  On the other hand, the EPA says the government provides enough support via federal tax breaks up to $1.80 per square foot and other miscellaneous energy conservation programs.  What do you say? 

The fact is, the boom in green buildings is being driven by (1) tenant demand and (2) federal, state, and local incentives.  But are there any other drivers pushing the green movement? 

  1. Social Pressure – depending on your business model, green buildings may be required to keep the sustainable message consistent corporate wide. 
  2. Lower Operating Costs – even if green buildings are more expensive to build, they are cheaper to operate, in terms of maintenance, water consumption, and energy consumption. 
  3. Marketing Advantage – this is related to #1, but a little different.  Caution on the green washing, but a green strategy can be good for (re) positioning according to the competition or targeting specific consumers. 
  4. Recruiting Magnet – instead of developing a corporate presence on Myspace or Second Life, why not do something substantial by making a difference?  Some of the best talent is going to companies that have a presence in savvy, green buildings. 
  5. Impairment – I’ve read from both Harvard Business Review and Ernst & Young that non-green buildings are going to be obsolete and could face big-time impairment charges. 

Green buildings are leasing up and other buildings tend towards higher vacancies (lower rents).  The best talent is going to the greenest companies.  Oil and coal companies are irritating customers and worrying shareholders because they won’t change their ways.  People are choosing companies with their wallets–they stop frequenting environmentally insensitive companies.  Water and energy is becoming a constrained resource and businesses that lower their costs by using less resources have a competitive advantage over competition.  These intangibles need to be considered when thinking about green buildings, because after all, it’s about value not cost. 

LEED-H Silver Kelly Woodford Retreat Near Mt. Hood, Oregon

Kelly_woodford_home

As one of the first residential LEED homes on the west coast, the Kelly Woodford home is blazing a trail for the future of residential construction.  In addition to its USGBC certification, the home is "net zero energy use" and Energy Star certified.  The 2,000 square-foot, three-bedroom/two-bath retreat has a great view of Mt. Hood and some pretty impressive green features.  Tom Kelly and Barbara Woodford built the home as a family getaway (with the Neil Kelly Company as general contractor), but they’ve also made the home available half the year to Neil Kelly employees to enjoy. 

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Corgan Christens New LEED Silver Headquarters

Corgan_dallas_hq

Today, Corgan Associates Inc. opened the doors to its brand new LEED Silver headquarters.  Corgan is a Dallas-based architectural + design firm and designed the three-story, 60,000 square-foot looker.  Being a tenant in the West End area of downtown since 1986, Corgan is a long-time downtown stalwart–it’s great to keep them there with a brand new building.  I drive by it on the way home from work, so I’ve been watching construction for the past year or so.  It looks great.  I really dig the copper facade on the north + west walls.

From what I understand, Corgan’s HQ was built by Turner Construction, well-known for pretty much every green building in the area, including Pat Lobb Toyota, SMU’s Embrey Engineering Building, and the energy-efficient Wal-Mart.  According to Corgan, "The architectural style and features of the West End will be reflected in the new building.  In a contemporary way, Corgan’s heavily rusticated masonry building will draw from area warehouse vocabulary.  The interior will feature a heavy timber structural frame, typical of historic structures in the West End.  The three floors of interior design studio spaces will also feature large expanses of glass."  Looks amazing.  Corgan’s HQ: 401 N. Houston Street.  Via DBJ

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