Independence Station, #1 Highest Scoring LEED Building

This is going to be a cool development when it’s complete.  Slated to be the #1 highest scoring LEED building in the world by a fair margin (meaning: Platinum Certification at 64-66 points), Independence Station is 35% complete and should beat Oregon’s strict energy code by about 74%.  Steven Ribeiro, developer and principal at Aldeia Development, energetically remarks on his project: "This retro-futuristic, mixed-use building will run on 100% renewable energy, primarily vegetable oil and the sun."  Sounds good to me. 

Here’s a list of some of the green features planned for Independence Station:

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By |February 8th, 2008|Categories: LEED, Solar|Tags: |8 Comments

The Green Building Revolution, a Book Giveaway

I really hate to do this, but I’m giving away a new, autographed copy of a book that I really like.  You know the drill:  leave a comment, and after 48 hours, I’ll pick […]

By |February 7th, 2008|Categories: book, LEED|Tags: |22 Comments

BRIO54 Homes with Modern Green Style

I received an email today from one of the co-founders of BRIO54, a young, design-driven development firm providing unique homes for a green, modern lifestyle.  Their first prototype is in the final planning stage with construction projected to begin by late spring.  To get an idea of their design capabilities, their website has three different designs:  H1 suburban design, H2 urban infill design, and H3 high ranch rehab design (the most affordable option). 

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By |February 7th, 2008|Categories: Modern architecture, Prefab, Single Family|Tags: |3 Comments

e3 House – Green Infill, Second Empire Style

Steve Duncan and Leslie Avery, designers and owners of 3rdEmpire Design, are proud to have registered the first LEED project in Newfoundland & Labrador-Canada.  With the e3 Home, they’re aiming for Gold Certification and plan on completion in September 2008.  Duncan and Avery say the home presents a unique challenge due to having to conform to local Heritage Area guidelines (because of its location in downtown St. Johns).

From the renderings, you’ll notice the second empire style architecture, which 3rdEmpire Design went with to complement the neighborhood.  The inside of the 3000 sf home will incorporate modern and innovative materials/technology, wherever possible, and will feature a more open design.  Proposed features include pervious hardscaping and landscaping, recycled construction waste, bamboo and cork flooring, thermostatically controlled radiant flooring, low E glass, low VOC paint, upgraded insulation, CFL and LED lighting, dual flush toilets and low flow faucets, FSC timber, use of natural ventilation and lighting.

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By |February 6th, 2008|Categories: LEED, Single Family|Tags: , |0 Comments

110 The Embarcadero, Simple and Viny Design

This is a concept rendering for 110 The Embarcadero.  We’re talking about very early stages here (this hasn’t been submitted to the planning committee yet), but the San Francisco Chronicle just profiled the new design.  The building is a 10-story structure envisioned for Embarcadero and designed by Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects for Hines.  The result, as you can see, is a glassy, viny, green mid-rise skyscraper.  I think 110 The Embarcadero is quite easy on the eye, to be entirely honest, and due to the simple design, it probably has excellent floor plates with great daylighting and views.  Can’t beat the location either, with a bird’s eye of both the city and the bay. 

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By |February 6th, 2008|Categories: Modern architecture, Nature, Skyscraper|0 Comments

Old Warehouse Converted to Modish Green Offices

Sometimes I wonder what kind of miracle it took to bring a deal like this to fruition.  You have this abandoned, 40-year old warehouse with contamination, structural, and code issues.  Nobody wants it.  And it’s probably much easier to go somewhere else and just do what everyone else does.  You rent space or build a new building.  But Jeff Reaves, president of Group MacKenzie, and Jay Haladay, owner of Coaxis, saw major potential in this dilapidated structure now known as RiverEast Center.  They decided to buy the property and wanted to convert it to office space for each of their growing company’s headquarters.  The result?

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By |February 5th, 2008|Categories: Corporate, Land Use, LEED|0 Comments
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