Dallas' Commerce Street Townhomes Receives Design Award

Commerce_street_front Local Dallas architect, Ron Wommack, received a 2006 Texas Society of Architects Design Award for his work on the Commerce Street Townhomes in east Dallas.  Actually, the site is located on a previously abandoned site, which was the industrial/manufacturing area east of downtown Dallas.  The neighborhood is gradually being renovated and transformed into residential living spaces.  With this project, one of the architect’s goals was to create a place that carried the baggage of location’s industrial past, so the design incorporates materials such as concrete blocks, metal, and wood (in the right colors).  I asked the architect about some of the sustainable features and wanted to relay those to the Jetson Green readership. 

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First, the buildling was designed to utilize natural light and shading (passive solar design), which is especially apparent in the trellised roof deck and the living room clerestory.  Second, you’ll notice, that the roof trellises were made with chain-link fence post pipe, which is easy to recycle and extremely low maintenance.  We’re thinking about the life cycle of the product here.  Third, the metal skins adjust quickly with the temperature changes.  And last, they used an HVAC system with a higher SEER rating (Seasonal Energy-Efficiency Rating – the higher the better…generally speaking, if you spend about $360 annually on AC with a 10-SEER, a move to the 16-SEER will save you $135 a year or so).  So, we’re seeing a little bit of green incorporated in the design, and the place is extremely striking, too.  Projects like this will help move Dallas forward into greener pastures of residential building. 

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Extra Links:
Ron Wommack Website
Texas Society of Architects Award Article [Texas Architect]

3form Releases 100 Percent, A 100% Recycled Decorative Panel

Flakes Low impact, high design.  I just wanted to let the architects and designers know about a cutting edge material from 3form called "100 Percent."  100 Percent is made from 100% post-consumer high-density polyethylene (HDPE).  Basically, 3form collects post-consumer HDPE flakes, sorts them by color, arranges the flake material to create a pattern, and then applies heat pressure to fuse the flakes into a single panel (without using binders).  100 Percent is currently available in one pattern and four colors (shown below), and the company is waiting for Greenguard Environmental Institute certification for low indoor emissions.

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While 100 Percent has yet to be installed on an actual project, it’s a very tough material and could be appropriate for high-abuse indoor applications (schools, bathrooms, etc.).  Indoor applications are limited by its UL 94 classification (HB) and outdoor applications are limited by its lack of UV protection.  3form says 100 Percent is "ideally suited for education, science, and health care environments."  This material was innovative enough to win the 2006 NeoCon Gold Award for surfacing materials at the NeoCon World’s Trade Fair.  The company is also well-known in the design world for its Varia materials line (made of Ecoresin–40% post-industrial reclaimed material).

Extra Links:
3form Website
3form Takes Recycled Content to 100 Percent [BuildingGreen.com]

Current Energy: The World's First Home Efficiency Store

Current_energy_map This is not an advertisement or a commercial.  I was going to the iPod store on Knox (in Uptown, Dallas) and noticed this new store right next door called "Current Energy."  Tag line:  "We’ll plug you in."  I liked the design of the store and decided to go in and check the place out.  First impression, these people are very friendly and eager to help.  Second impression, what are they selling?  That’s below.  The store was pretty cool, and the website‘s not too shabby either. 

Here’s what they are selling/explaining/consulting, etc.:  Rinnai tankless water heater, Rainbird irrigation control, Toto dual flush toilet, Honeywell digital thermostats + air treatment systems, Lutron + Crestron whole house controls, Mitsubishi Mr. Slim ductless air conditioner, Neptune cfl + lighting science group LED lights, Trane xl19i Seer air conditioner, Radiant Barrier products, Vista window tinting and solar screens, Owens corning insulation products, etc.  They have a consultation room, kids learning center (using state-of-the-art macs and computer games), and home energy resource library. 

They give you information on switching your electric provider (explaining both the low-cost options (Gexa) and green options (Green Mountain)).  They can talk you through the benefits of Energy Star and you can ask them all sorts of questions.  They provide energy audit services, etc.  I did stump them a couple times with my questions, but they were willing to get the answers.  If you’re thinking about renovating, buying, building new, or whatever, you should educate yourself and go talk to these people.  They’ll open your eyes to new ideas, that’s for sure. 

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Here’s the address for all you Dallasites:
3103 Knox Street, Dallas, Texas  75205
www.currentenergy.com

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