Kicking Out the Shouts: 10,000 Visits – Arigatou Gozaimasu

Ucdavis_wind_farm_rendering

Hey everyone, I justed wanted to kick out some shouts…over the weekend, the ole’ blog passed the 10,000 visits mark (page views was a long time ago).  Since embarking on this crazy, edifying, never-ending social experiment, my perspective has changed and I’ve been influenced by the sustainable movement in a big way.  I thank you for that.  This is the 120th post, so I guess that means my posts average about 85 visitors??  Well, back in the early days, I think I’d get about 5-10 visitors, and now that’s a lot different.  I know there are tons of blogs out there that get 10,000 or 100,000 or 1,000,000 visits per day, but I’m mighty proud of where Jetson Green is. 

So, I’m kicking out shouts to some of you blogs that keep traffic coming back.  Like I always say, keep commenting and sending emails.  I really enjoy interacting with you readers, whether you’re spearheading a major PR company for green businesses or looking to build a green home in South Carolina, that’s great with me. 

I look forward to the next 10,000 or 100,000 or 1,000,000 visits, and hope you stay along for the ride.  As Mike always says, "Keep it Contagious." 

Skyscraper Sunday: 1800 Larimer LEED Silver Office Tower (Denver)

1800_larimer 1800_larimer_night

Apparently, the mid-1980s was the last time a new high rise office building was built in Denver, Colorado.  We know what happened then and why skyscraper construction halted (hint: construction loans/S+L Crisis); knock on wood…S+L 2.0??  Recently, Westfield Development announced plans to build the most energy efficient high rise in downtown Denver, 1800 Larimer–actually, it’s a $150 million, 22 story, 500,000 square foot, energy-efficient, proposed LEED Silver tower.  Westfield Development President Rich McClintock said, "if it is not a sustainable building, it is outdated."  I couldn’t agree more. 

This LoDo area building was designed by Denver-based RNL Design.  Some of the features include the following:  subfloor air distribution system; 9-foot, 6-inch floor-to-ceiling windows; state-of-the-art health club for tenants; a half-acre terrace parklike environment 20 feet off the ground; tenant controlled temperature system; blue + gray glass facade; trees in the lobby; and a 30-foot high "wall of water" inside the lobby.  I’m excited that new construction is going green, but I will say that Denver is working hard to make the right choices.  This green building is, after all, only a small kog in the greater machine initiated by Denver’s Mayor Hickenlooper called Greenprint Denver

I keep saying this, but the smartest cities are also the greenest:  San Francisco, Portland, Denver, Austin, Chicago, and a trailing Salt Lake City.  The human capital + brain power of these cities is really mind-boggling, so where are you going to live?  Via RMN

Lobby_wall_of_water

UPDATE:  According to the global votes of over 100,000 people, Mayor Hickenlooper was ranked #9 in a survey of best mayors in the world that have made long-lasting contributions to their cities.  Only one other US mayor made the list.

Green Economics: City of Phoenix Saving $600k/year Due to Energy-Efficiency Program

Cfls If you’re new to CFLs, feel free to check out the Department of Energy’s information page on them.  When compared to incandescents, CFLs last longer, use less energy, and emit less heat.  While you need to pick the right one depending on your lighting idiosyncrasies and bulbs need to be disposed of at a hazardous waste center (see your packaging), groups like One Billion Bulbs are trying to get the word out on the benefits of CFLs.  It’s hard to calculate, but when energy is saved, the grid is called upon less and that’s a tangible benefit to your bill and your city.  Cities that keep using more energy end up debating with large companies like TXU about the pragmatics of building 11 more coal plants to meet out-of-control demand for cheap energy.  There are alternatives…

There’s an economic case for CFLs.  The City of Phoenix is saving about $600,000 a year after replacing traditional lighting with CFLs.  Mayor Phil Gordon said the city has replaced about 95% of the city’s lights with energy-efficient alternatives (as part of a $1.2 million one-time investment) and is starting to see the rewards.  At $600,000 in savings per year, that’s a 2 year payback on your investment.  This is smart business. 

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