Articles - News RSS Feed

Jetson Green Partners with West Coast Green

West Coast Green I’d like to make it easy for you to attend West Coast Green 2007.  This will mark our 1st year as a premiere Media Partner with the nation’s largest residential green building conference and trade show. The event takes place on September 20-22, 2007, at the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium in San Francisco, CA. The first two days of the conference are reserved for trade only, and on day three, the doors open to homeowners. 

Taking a walk on the trade show floor of West Coast Green will provide you with hundreds of ideas on how to green your home; from simple items like eco-friendly paints and sustainable home furnishings to building a green home from the ground up.  West Coast Green has gone the distance to find and showcase the best green building resources, exhibits, trainings, presentations, and educational tracks, while ensuring you have an unparalleled experience.

Highlights for 2007 include:

  • 275 exhibitors displaying the latest in green design and building products
  • 250 renowned speakers and visionaries
  • The Futures Room – filled with green innovations soon to come
  • Green Built Pre-fabricated Home – designed by Michelle Kaufmann and built by Extreme Homes, to be placed on City County Plaza directly across from West Coast Green for the duration of the conference and will be open for West Coast Green attendees to tour (the mkLotus).

As a special gift, I’m proud to announce, by the generosity of West Coast Green, a 20% discount on your full conference registration.  Please enter the following promotional code when registering to receive discount:  jg3554.  Register at West Coast Green or call 1-800-724-4880. 

Do SUNSLATES Answer NIMBYs?

Single_sunslates_tile_2 This is going to be a short post, but I stumbled upon this building integrated solar technology called "SUNSLATES."  As you can see, they are low-profile roof tiles that fit on part of your roof.  To get an idea of the size, a system of 216 Sunslates will take up about 300 sq ft on your roof.  They’re installed in strings of 24, with each string having a home run cable that goes directly to the attic junction box.  That cable then gets spliced into the cable that runs to the inverter (although I’m not an electrician and can’t be 100% certain).  What’s the cost?  Roughly $13,000 per 100 sf of Sunslates, or $13.00 per watt, before any state or federal rebates.  Might be a little expensive, but I’m wondering if this kind of technology takes the "m" out of NIMBY.  Recall the recent news regarding Al Gore not being able to install solar panels on his roof?  Well, if the panels are integrated into the roof, does this shut the NIMBY up?  Via

Brad Pitt's Hypnotic, Green Holy Cross Project

Active

My wife sent me this article from Perez Hilton about Brad Pitt, who will be appearing on NBC’s Today with Ann Curry to talk about his green development project in New Orleans.  I’m not a reader of the celebrity sites, so I would have missed this, but the New Orleans development project is really moving along.  And the green houses they are building are 100% incredible.  Brad has good style — it fits so well with Jetson Green, we should just bring him on as a regular writer! 

Global Green broke ground on the Holy Cross Project on May 10.  Yesterday, they unveiled the progress on this first home, which is still under construction.  It’s going to be a showcase home, but in total, the Holy Cross Project will have 5 homes and 18 apartments.  All of them will be affordable and green.  The goals of the project are to achieve LEED Platinum certification (LEED-H for the single family homes and LEED-NC for the other buildings), net zero energy, and carbon neutral building. By using solar panels, high performance building design, HVAC systems, energy and resource monitoring systems, and energy efficient appliances, the buildings in the Holy Cross Project will use at least 75% less energy than typical buildings. In addition, Global Green is also exploring the use of river turbines in the adjacent Mississipi River.

Read more »

Major Milestones for Jetson Green

This is just a quick administrative post on the status of Jetson Green.  I’m pleased to announce that Jetson Green has come upon two major milestones:  (1) passing the 100,000 unique visitors threshold + (2) passing the one year mark in existence.  As another interesting note, this post is number 400 for Jetson Green.  I’m proud of these achievements, but I want to thank the readers of Jetson Green.  We’re currently hovering around 900 readers in the feed, so this website is becoming considerable in reach.  As you can see from the graph below, it just keeps growing and improving.  I think these numbers are incredible, especially because this is a one-person endeavor and we haven’t hit the front page of digg (or similar).

Read more »

Home Design + Construction, Consumer Environmentalism + Corporate Sustainability (WIR)

Week in Review
  1. Why is new housing so big and lousy?  Why do builders build these homes? 
  2. Despite unwavering focus by the media, government and business, "going green" is only of moderate concern to most consumers, according to a recent research study.
  3. There is a reason why homes rot (hint: it has to do with much more than age). 
  4. Shades of Green – with more large companies going green, the entire industry is under scrutiny. 

Scientists Suspect Sprawl Destroyed Angkor Wat

Angkor Wat Temple Model

The implications of this research are unbelievable.  Seriously.  I’ve written about the ten common problems associated with sprawl previously, but this story opens up the discussion again.  Angkor Wat is the home of a magnificent temple in Cambodia and was the center to one of the largest cities in the pre-industrialized world.  Recently, NASA used ground-sensing radar to study the extent of the city and found that it took up approximately 400 square miles.  In comparison, Phoenix sprawls across about 500 square miles, not including the suburbs.  The research revealed a complex network of canals, 1,000 man-made ponds, and roughly 70 long-lost temples.  The canals carried and distributed water towards the temple and through the south of Angkor.  Interestingly, the study also revealed evidence of breaches in dykes and areas where they attempted to fix the canals. 

What’s most interesting is the idea that Angkor’s increasingly intricate and complex system of canals might have been too expensive and difficult to maintain.  So, there was an elaborate infrastructure that might have run into disrepair … which possibly contributed to the downfall of Angkor?  This is very interesting research.  Apply that to our situation and query whether the issues we have with the levees in New Orleans or the bridge in Minnesota parallel the situation in Angkor.  Do we have an infrastructure, fueled by sprawl and fractional planning, that is too expensive to maintain? 

Read more »



Popular Topics on Jetson Green