Smarter and Greener: The Future of Building

Print The face of construction is changing fast as innovative technologies introduce smarter and greener building methods and materials to help the industry’s future meet consumer demands to save energy and the environment.

 


Inspiration from the way termites build their mounds has engineers at Harvard researching swarm robotics, which are thought to be the way forward. This pioneering technology uses robots which can multi-task rather than just being programmed to carry out one duty. This means should a robot malfunction another can immediately take its place to get the building completed on time.

3D printed houses are another area where designers are looking to change the face of construction. This type of housing is already in existence in China and have been tested by the WinSun company, while DUS architects in the Netherlands are also experimenting using 3D printed buildings. Coupled with swarm robots, 3D printed houses could potentially be built virtually anywhere, including other planets or the moon.

Construction materials are also under constant research and development. Some of the latest innovations include Aerogel Insulation, an ultra-strong, lightweight, see-through aluminium that has super-insulating properties and Microalgae which has the ability to produce renewable energy and provide shade.

The infographic offers an insight into these new building materials and construction methodologies. It also takes a look at some buildings that are leading in the way in smarter and greener construction, including the Crystal in London and The Edge Building in Amsterdam.

With smart buildings breaking the mould from design and conception, the materials being used to the way they are built, they are showing us how to be more eco-friendly and potentially increase productivity without having detrimental effects on the world around us.

Using renewable energy sources, having their own recycling abilities and using data collection to make working spaces more efficient, smart buildings are becoming a reality on a global level.

Infographic courtesy of RubberBond.co.uk.

Cleaner and Smater Green Technology

By |September 8th, 2016|Green Building|0 Comments

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Spend Your Vacation in a Tiny House Village

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By |August 19th, 2016|Green Building|1 Comment

Rent a Box in Someone’s Home

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By |August 8th, 2016|Green Building|2 Comments

Beach House Clad in Cork

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By |August 4th, 2016|Green Building|0 Comments

Wooden Tower Planned in Holland

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Building wooden skyscrapers seems to be gaining in popularity, and now one is going up in Amsterdam. The so-called Haut tower was designed by the Dutch firm Team V Architecture and they plan to begin construction in the later part of 2017. (more…)

By |July 24th, 2016|Green Building|0 Comments