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The Millennial Tiny House is Full of Space Saving Ideas

The New Zealand firm Build Tiny recently completed a tiny home, which has some very innovative and effective space-saving features. This so-called Millennial Tiny House is also available to buy at various price points and is therefore accessible to those on a budget, as well as those who want a fully equipped home, which they can move into right away.

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By |February 13th, 2018|Affordable, Design|0 Comments

World’s Tallest Timber Tower Might Get Built in NYC

The New York City-based architecture firm DFA Studio recently turned in a proposal for an observation tower made of wood.  If built, the structure would be the tallest timber tower in the world, and would offer great views of NYC from its location in Central Park. In addition to that, it would also be used to filter the Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Reservoir in the park, turning it into a freshwater pond which everyone could use.

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By |February 12th, 2018|Design, Modern architecture, Prefab|0 Comments

Fully Customizable Off-grid Tiny Home

Living Room

Since tiny homes are so small, the key to living in them comfortably is a clever interior layout. And this is best achieved when it is tailored to your specific needs.  Enter the so-called Kootenay tiny house built by the firm TruForm Tiny. Potential customers have a wide range of layouts, as well as size, materials, colors, and even furniture to choose from when ordering one.  The home is towable and can also be made to operate completely off-the-grid.

The Kootenay comes in three sizes, namely 20, 24, and 28 ft (6, 7.3, and 8.5 m) in length.  The model pictured in this post is the largest, 28 ft (8.5 m)-long one.  Its total floor space measures 379 sq ft (35.2 sq m) and it features a metal roof.  The exterior cladding comes in different colors and wood types, while the color of the roof, the style of the exterior and even the window frames can also be chosen by the customer.

Exterior Deck

Exterior Side

Sleeping Loft

The interior features a living area with a sofa, a kitchen with a well-sized breakfast bar, a small oven and plenty of cupboards and shelves.  There is also enough room for a washer/dryer, dishwasher, and full-size appliances, which can be purchased as optional extras.

The far end of the home is taken up by a relatively spacious bathroom, which features a full-size bathtub. The Kootenay has two lofts. The larger one is accessible via a set of stairs and is meant as the master bedroom, though the latter can also be installed on the ground level should the client wish so.  The second loft is accessible via a ladder, and can be used as a guest room, though it is perhaps more suitable as a storage area.   The home also features a drop down deck, which extends from the living area.

Kitchen

Breakfast Bar

Bathroom

The Kootenay can be connected to the grid via a standard RV-style hookup, but a custom off-grid package is also available. This includes a solar power array, a wood-burning stove, a composting toilet, and a propane-powered fridge.

The basic version of The Kootenay costs $57,900.

By |February 10th, 2018|Affordable, Design, Modern architecture|0 Comments

Tiny Home With a Flexible Interior

The recently completed Pacific Harmony tiny home, designed and built by the firm Handcrafted Movement, features superb craftsmanship and some unique interior layout ideas, which make it appear much more spacious than it is. This includes a bedroom, which can be turned into a dining room when needed.

The Pacific Harmony home is towable, and measures 28 ft (8.5 m) in length. The exterior cladding is board and batten, with accents made of Pacific Cedar, while the roof is standing seam metal. Much of the interior is taken up by the living room, which is placed in the center of the home and fitted with a sofa, and a large entertainment center. One of the bedrooms is also located on the ground level, next to the living room. It features a folding oak dining table, which can be folded out of the way when not needed so as to make room for the Murphy style bed.

Dining Area

Murphy Bed

Loft Bedroom

On the opposite side of the home is the kitchen, which features a propane-powered four-burner range cooker and a fridge/freezer. There is also a built-in breakfast bar, which can seat up to three people. The bathroom is adjacent to the kitchen and features a shower, sink and toilet. There is a sleeping loft above the kitchen, which is big enough for a double bed. It is accessible via a ladder which was made out of salvaged walnut. The flooring of the home is herringbone hardwood, while the countertops are made of quartz.

The tiny house gets its power via a standard RV-style hookup and has a propane-powered water heater. They also installed LED lighting throughout. There is also a small exterior deck, which is big enough for a table and chairs and needs to be taken off for traveling.

The Pacific Harmony is selling for $79,000.

Living Area

Kitchen

By |November 19th, 2017|Affordable, Design|0 Comments

Super-Thin Solar Cell

thincell

Solar energy will very likely be the main source of power as the world continues to strive toward greater sustainability. But it won’t be just the large panels that get the job done. In fact, I’m willing to bet that ultra thin and flexible solar cells that can be attached to virtually any surface will be the future. Which is why breakthroughs in this area are so important. And now a team of South Korea scientists has successfully created a super thin solar cell, which is so flexible it can be wrapped around a pencil without causing damage or too much strain to it. (more…)

By |November 2nd, 2017|Green Tech|0 Comments

Recycled Tile Used to Reduce Solar Heat Gain

ext

Poor insulation is one of the main problems when renovating old homes into modern residences. It results in excessive heat gain during the summer, and heat loss in the winter. Architect Drtan Lm from Malaysia recently completed a renovation of a home where they took an interesting approach to combating heat gain. The house they worked on was quite dilapidated, but it did contain a lot of intact terracotta tiles, which they decided to recycle into a sunshade for the home. (more…)

By |November 1st, 2017|Green Building|0 Comments