I like spending as much time as I can outdoors, even if it is just sitting somewhere and writing, so I love house designs which minimize the separation between indoor and outdoor spaces. This tiny house, designed by cc-studio of Amsterdam is a great example of this. It’s called Thoreau’s Cabin, to honor American author Henry David Thoreau, and it is basically an off-the-grid shelter with a wood-burning stove and large sliding doors dominating most of its walls. This opens it up to the surrounding nature and it would make for a great cabin, home office or even a tiny home.


Thoreau’s Cabin was built in a 5,900-acre (2,387-hectare) park in Utrecht, Netherlands, in place of an old cottage that stood there since the 1960s. The cabin is used mostly to store supplies used by park workers and volunteers, while it also offers a cozy and dry shelter for them.


The cabin has an aluminum roof, while the exterior cladding is also made from this material. The interior walls are clad in natural wood. The cabin has a usable floor space of 452 sq ft (42 sq m). The majority of this is taken up by the living area, though there is also a kitchenette, a bedroom, and a laundry/storage room. There is no toilet or bathroom though.



Thoreau’s Cabin functions completely off-the-grid. Water can be drawn from a nearby well, while running water in the kitchen is available via a small pump that draws it from a small tank in the kitchen cabinet. The wood-burning stove provides heating, while with the large sliding doors offer great ventilation in the summer. The cabin was built last year, and definitely represents a great way of erasing the line between indoor and outdoor spaces.