A single, standard-sized shipping container works out great for a tiny living space, but might feel a little cramped. And therein lies the beauty of constructing a house out of shipping containers. You can easily stack them up, or line them side by side to create a larger dwelling. Below you will find five of the most ingenious luxury homes made from shipping containers, which are still quite sustainable, despite their larger size.

1. Beach Box

hampton

This is a shipping container house located in the Hamptons in New York. The house was built out of six shipping containers and measures 2,000 square feet with a bonus 1,300 square feet of exterior deck. It features EcoTop counters, tankless water heating, a 16 SEER HVAC unit, and Energy Star appliances. The house is insulated with spray foam insulation and features a white thermoplastic roof, and FSC-certified cypress siding. Due to the cedar siding, the home looks nothing like a shipping container house from the outside, though the designers did leave the ceilings in their original state. more details…

2. The Sarah House

sarah

The Sarah container home was constructed out of two 40-foot-long, 9-foot-6-inches-tall and 8-foot-wide recycled containers, which resulted in a total living area of 672-square-feet. The house is equipped with a gas-powered Rinnai tankless, point of demand water heating system, while for heating and cooling, a mini-split system made by Mitsubishi was installed. The system is able to track the occupants and point the heat or cooling towards them, which enabled the builders to forgo the ducting process. To insulate the house, they used Eckles insulation, which is natural insulation that uses sugar corn as a binder. more details…

3. Redondo Beach House

redonondo

This luxury shipping container home, located in California, was designed by DeMaria Design Associates. The home was built out of eight shipping container and is a luxury two-story, 3,200-square-foot home. Apart from using the shipping containers, the builders also used a number of other repurposed materials, including folding airplane hangar doors. For insulation, they used NASA-developed ceramic coating insulation, which was sprayed on with a coat that is slightly thicker than a credit card. more details…