Windows with Energy Efficiency in Mind

This is another installment in our series called Energy-Efficient Windows 101 made possible by Marvin Windows and Doors. In our first article of the series, I discussed some window basics and how to read a home window label.  Now I want to discuss more product options available for your energy-efficient windows.  When you buy Marvin windows, you’ll have the opportunity to decide how many panes you need and which glazing and gas options can contribute towards your home performance goals and well as maximize your comfort.

Dual- or Triple-Pane Windows

Marvin has window products with two or three panes of glass.  Triple-pane, or tripane, windows are usually thicker, heavier, and have a lower U-factor and are attractive for northern climates. That said, dual-pane windows are the most common and perform well. Your local dealer can help you select the right coatings for your climate; for example, some coatings are more ideal for the north while others for southern climate zones.

Insulating Glass Glazing Options

Marvin can cover glass panes with a thin layer of metallic material to improve the energy performance of the window.  Specifically, low-emissivity, also LoE or Low-E, coatings on the glass surface and gaps between each pane can be used to block heat transfer through a window.  The following coatings are available, depending on window and door needs:

LoĒ-180® – a single metallic coating blocks heat loss to the outside and reflects heat back inside a home.  This coating is used when a high SGHC is needed, such as in northern climates.

LoĒ2-272® – a double metallic coating on the inside glass surface reflects heat into a room and rejects the warmth in the summer.  This coating is better at reducing heat loss than the LoĒ-180 and may be suitable in all climates except the Southern zone of Energy Star.

LoĒ3-366® – a triple metallic coating of silver which provides a lower U-factor and lower SHGC than the other two coatings.  This option is recommended in areas with intense sun and high cooling costs.

Insulating Gases Between Panes

In addition, Marvin can inject gases between panes to improve window performance.  Standard windows have argon to increase energy efficiency, while a blend of krypton, argon, and air is available in tripane products for enhanced performance in northern climates.

Wood/Aluminum Frame Options

Marvin offers wood interior or exterior, as well as durable extruded aluminum exterior option.

Additional Window Options

A couple of other options merit a quick mention as well. Marvin offers glass from Cardinal, whose designs prevent heat loss around the window perimeter. Marvin also offers an Energy Panel, which is a removable exterior glass panel with glazing that can be used to improve the performance of single-glazing wood windows.

Marvin has a fall energy efficiency program with the Smart Performance Promotion giving one lucky homeowner $5,000 toward the purchase of new Marvin windows and doors. In connection with the promotion, Marvin has a collection of energy efficiency and other home improvement tips from Lou Manfredini, a homebuilder, contributor to the Today Show, and host of HouseSmarts TV.


Article tags: , , , ,
  • caveman664

    I often wonder what the percentage improvement between double- and triple-pane windows are. I have not found any stats on that. My feeling is that the costs (in the US at least) don’t yet warrant the up charge.

  • Garth

    Very informative! Thanks.

  • Dwight

    Great article Preston, but no mention of actual R value for us laymen to figure the average R of a wall. [part glass & bigger part non glass]
    I read about a one inch thick window glass full of bubbles but same visual as tripane, and an R 20 rating
    This was in the eighties, and due for production in near future, of course
    never heard of again.
    Cheers,
    Dwight

  • Dwight

    Great article Preston, but no mention of actual R value for us laymen to figure the average R of a wall. [part glass & bigger part non glass]
    I read about a one inch thick window glass full of bubbles but same visual as tripane, and an R 20 rating
    This was in the eighties, and due for production in near future, of course
    never heard of again.
    Cheers,
    Dwight

  • Pingback: How to Increase Home Energy Efficiency with Interior Sliding Glass Doors | GreenLifeXperience.com

Popular Topics on Jetson Green