Clayton Homes Intros Home Energy Guide

Clayton Homes, maker of the popular i-House, is the largest producer of homes in the country and accounted for 7% of homes constructed in 2011, according to the annual report of parent Berkshire Hathaway.  They have a large residential footprint, and their efforts to educate home purchasers can go a long way.  So it’s great to learn of their recent announcement of a new home energy label along the lines of what we’ve discussed previously with other builders.

The following Home Energy Guide has been rolled out across the country to every new home the company has on display.

Clayton’s home energy label is modeled after the DOE’s Builders Challenge label, yet it’s different in some respects.  The company took feedback and found that homeowners want four things in a label: (1) a visual scale, (2) energy saving features, (3) projected monthly costs, and (4) projected savings compared to a home without the energy saving features.

Each home will display a specific and unique label in the interior that can help home purchasers understand (and compare with other homes) the energy impact of their home under certain assumptions like utility rates, occupant behavior, and climate patterns.

Credits: Clayton Homes.


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  • http://www.homeforsaleinottawa.com/ Raysmileymarketing

    I really like the i-house and I hope that more homes will take up their design and concepts. It was interesting to note your points about what homeowners want, ”
    (1) a visual scale, (2) energy saving features, (3) projected monthly costs, and (4) projected savings compared to a home without the energy saving features.” I think we could save a lot more money as well as be responsible in how much energy we consume. 

  • TedKidd

    Cool, but doesn’t tell me incremental cost. If it costs $250 to save $73, I’m not sure I’d want that supposedly better home. If its $100, let’s talk about non-quantifiable benefits that might be worth $27 a month. If its less than $73, seems a no brainer.

    But without reference to incremental cost, this may be a marketing tool but it’s not an analysis tool. My next concern would be to see how savings data are arrived at. Is that $146 and the $220 an unsupported guess, or does it have actual homes behind it.

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