Home Depot Creates Products List for LEED

We’re in a $17 billion market for new green homes, so it makes sense that the USGBC and Home Depot would team up to make green building products more accessible. Today, the USGBC and Home Depot announced a new database – available through LEEDHomeDepot.com – currently listing more than 2,500 products that contribute towards LEED for Homes certification.

All of the products on the database are sold by Home Depot and include insulation, windows, fixtures, appliances, sealants, countertops, doors, flooring, etc. The database will certainly make it easier for purchasers to find better green home products in all categories.

Yet one small thing to keep in mind is the fact that LEED for Homes requires a lot more than simply racking up green products that might contribute toward 45 (Certified), 60 (Silver), 75 (Gold), or 90 (Platinum) points. LEED has various prerequisites and products alone, without good design and proper construction, hardly make a green home.

Lindsay Chason, senior manager of Environmental Innovation at The Home Depot, said: “we want to show our customers that building green can be easy and affordable … we have innovative, environmentally-friendly products that make LEED certification simpler,” according to a statement.

[+] View the Home Depot micro-site relating to LEED for Homes.

Credits: Home Depot.


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  • Vicki Bischoff

    First thing, Preston, I really want to thank you for your Blog. You do a great job of digging up the most relevant information on what’s going on in the Green Building Industry. I look forward to reading your posts daily. That said, this link to the Home Depot goes green thing has disturbed me a bit. And not because you posted it. Does anyone else out there feel that this is just a big Greenwash? Everyone wants to cash in on Green, but few are talking about Sustainable; holistic green. Looking at the products that get LEED certification is very disappointing. A faucet, just because it’s water saving? How about that they make those for Home Depot with plastic guts? Does the company that produces these products have to be globally sustainable in anyway to get the LEED stamp of approval?

    • http://www.jetsongreen.com Preston

       Vicki, I can certainly understand where you’re coming from.  It’s the tension between incremental and revolutionary actions that relate to our environment.  We’re all taking baby steps. 

  • geoffrey fulton

    Preston you are right in your response to Vicki.
    There is an old saying “Slowly, slowly catch the monkey”
    and “Rome wasn’t built in a day”
    We are all trying to move in the right direction step by step. Any improvement is better than none at all. We and the rest of the world can’t all be extremely perfect from the word “Go!”. But we are LEEDing the way each in our own way.
    We are developing the shipping container lane at http://www.fultonsalomon.com

  • John Meggs

    Preston, great job of keeping many of us current on major changes in the market.  My view of this move by the USGBC is that they are becoming more like the NFL or NASCAR than a non-profit organization with leadership as their founding principal.  I am glad to see the big box stores carrying better products, but almost by definition, if it is stocked at their stores it is no longer at the leading edge of innovation.  I view this as the USGBC placing their ‘leadership role’ in green building behind the ‘corporate sponsorship to help in funding role’.  I respected the USGBC many years ago when they would not allow basic LEED points for a specific product even when it was superior, since it would be viewed as endorsing a specific company and/or product, not a general leadership solution.  I do not respect the USGBC for partnering with a specific huge corporation about ‘standard’ green building products when their are many smaller green building supply companies that offer ‘leadership’ products and have been doing so for a much longer time than the major corporations.  For full disclosure, I attended my first USGBC conference in Pittsburgh in 2003 and have been the owner of one of those smaller green building supply companies since 2003.

  • John Meggs

    Preston, great job of keeping many of us current on major changes in the market.  My view of this move by the USGBC is that they are becoming more like the NFL or NASCAR than a non-profit organization with leadership as their founding principal.  I am glad to see the big box stores carrying better products, but almost by definition, if it is stocked at their stores it is no longer at the leading edge of innovation.  I view this as the USGBC placing their ‘leadership role’ in green building behind the ‘corporate sponsorship to help in funding role’.  I respected the USGBC many years ago when they would not allow basic LEED points for a specific product even when it was superior, since it would be viewed as endorsing a specific company and/or product, not a general leadership solution.  I do not respect the USGBC for partnering with a specific huge corporation about ‘standard’ green building products when their are many smaller green building supply companies that offer ‘leadership’ products and have been doing so for a much longer time than the major corporations.  For full disclosure, I attended my first USGBC conference in Pittsburgh in 2003 and have been the owner of one of those smaller green building supply companies since 2003.

    • http://www.jetsongreen.com Preston

       John, thanks for your thoughtful response.  I can see your perspective and hope that, perhaps in this regard, a rising tide lifts all boats.

  • http://homeandgreenenergy.com/ Steve Heis

    That’s a big example of green going mainstream. Obviously, this will bring the good and the bad part of it. If there is a big store coming out to play it means we’re all heading in the right way. But we’ll have to adapt to the reality of other grown up industries. Eventually the niche business will arise which is always good too.

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