LivingHomes Unveils Low-Cost C6 Prefab

This is C6, the first low-cost LivingHome and the only “Zero Energy, Zero Carbon production home ever to feature a LEED Platinum level environmental program and Cradle-to-Cradle inspired materials,” according to California-based green prefab company, LivingHomes.  It was designed by LivingHomes in collaboration with Make It Right, which was founded by Brad Pitt and Bill McDonough, and will open for tours this month in Palm Springs, California (and there’s also one in Long Beach).

C6 is outfitted with James Hardie siding, Thermatru doors, Andersen windows, Verve lighting, GE kitchen and laundry appliances, a Nest thermostat, Kohler fixtures, Mosa tile, Millstead cork floors, Armstrong cabinets, and Staron countertops, etc.

C6 also features a patent-pending door handle designed by architect Bill McDonough that’s supposed to give the owners a dose of Zinc with every touch.

Together, the products and design facilitate a California-style, indoor-outdoor experience that makes a total 1,232 square feet feel a lot bigger than it is.

The three-bedroom, two-bath C6 sells complete from ~$179,000, depending on local costs, including permit-ready drawings and excluding things like permits, transport, install, landscape, and foundation.  A portion of the proceeds from each C6 sale will go towards Make It Right.

[+] More about the C6 Prefab by Living Homes/Make It Right.

Credits: Izumi Tanaka. 


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  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000024477616 Lynn Pelletier

    would love to know the cost of this home in the caribbean, which is where I want to build something for retirement living…

  • http://twitter.com/onreact_com Tad Chef

    Sorry, but 180k is not low cost whatsoever, plus it looks ugly. Compare it to the Rocio Romero prefabs that are affordable and modern in appearance and you know what I mean.

    • http://www.facebook.com/crystal.blanton.cloakey Crystal Cloakey

      Actually for a TOTALLY GREEN home that is a low cost.  

      • http://twitter.com/onreact_com Tad Chef

        Yeah, for a GREEN SUPERCAR the Tesla is low cost as well. ;-)

    • VintageVNvet

      Right  you are Tad Chef, this house is a BIG FRAUD, and shows what a fraud LEED is. 

      with labor sharing with neighbors,, i am just finishing a  “green” house, about this same size,,, wood frame on reinforced concrete foundation, with wood panel interior, wood siding and shingles exterior:  where this one is approx $145 per square foot, plus installation and all the other things noted in article , mine is approx $45 with installation AND all things mentioned, except land cost,,, plus, all wood from within 50 miles or soneighbors here are building simple houses of various sizes, cooperatively, for approx $30/SF, not counting land or labor, which is all volunteer

      Sorry Brad, i admire your interest, enthusiasm, and willingness, but this house is a high tech and high priced mobile home for the rich folks

      • http://twitter.com/onreact_com Tad Chef

        Nobody said it’s a fraud. It’s just not affordable. Congrats that you can afford to build a house at all in these times. Have you looked up the LV by Rocio Romero I suggested as an truly affordable alternative? It’s 40k by itself and even with all additional costs can be set up way below 100k. It may not be certified and completely green etc. but after all it IS affordable.

        • Gary-L

           From the Rocio Romero website:

          “On average the home costs $120-$195 per sq. ft. to build. This includes all
          the construction costs associated with the LV Home. …

          This price does not include costs outside of the LV Home build, such as the
          cost of land, landscaping, or infrastructure (wells, driveways, septic,
          landscaping, etc.).

          In the Midwest, the LV can be built around $120 per sq. ft. In California,
          as well as certain select areas on the East Coast where higher labor costs
          exist, the average is between $150-$195 per sq. ft.

          DIYers have built LV Series Homes for as low as $87 per sq. ft. and high-end
          client build outs have been as high as $250 per sq. ft.”
          Tad Chef: How did you figure “set up way below $100,000″?

    • Affordabl87987e

       Dude..This is CALIFORNIA!!!! Totally affordable

      Are you living in the Ozarks of Arkansas?!!!

  • http://profiles.google.com/tovarichpeter Peter Christiansen

    $180,00 PLUS the cost of the lot, etc. is NOT affordable for the majority of Americans.  Time to go back to the drawing boards.  

  • http://profiles.google.com/tovarichpeter Peter Christiansen

    $180,00 PLUS the cost of the lot, etc. is NOT affordable for the majority of Americans.  Time to go back to the drawing boards.  

    • http://www.jetsongreen.com Preston

      Land is expensive in many areas, but keep this in mind, according to the US Census Bureau: In 2011, “the average sales price of new single-family homes sold was $272,900.”

      • http://twitter.com/onreact_com Tad Chef

        That data is probably skewed due to the mansions some 1%ers buy for millions.

      • VintageVNvet

        Preston, you are probably correct, as is Tad Chef replying,,, however,,, the point must be that the $273K you cite INCLUDES all of the things noted as excluded in your article. 

        PLUS the land,, which can be a great deal more costly than the actual construction… and I was not the least surprised and asking price of $400K for this house.

        PLUS the size of the $273K house is likely at least 1,800SF, and probably more including such “luxuries” as a garage, etc., etc., 

  • Chuck Newton

    I understand that green is good, and green tends to move housing in a weak market.  And, real estate prices are still stratospheric on the two coasts.  I like the house.  It is modern in style.  But, I still think the problem with green and especially the problem with prefab homes is that most builders have yet to figure out how to price them competitive.  I can still build that house on site in Houston TX and do it for less than it would take to do it prefab and set it up on a lot.  Which is silly when you think about it, because the waste is likely to be a lot more.  The energy cost of production is likely to be more.  The time to complete construction, and the increase in construction interest, is likely to be more.  So, where is all of the cost savings this is suppose to produce.  One has to assume that for any number of reasons it is not being passed on to the consumer because it is “green”.  Something like the perception of an AMEX platinum card is better than the gold card, such as to justify more fees and costs for the mere prestige.  My guess is that when green becomes more standard, the difference will fade.

    • http://www.jetsongreen.com Preston

       This has to be the comment of the week.

  • http://twitter.com/bruteforceblog mike eliason

    zero carbon – so this thing is off-grid? grid-tied net zero isn’t ‘zero carbon’, tho it’s a nice marketing gimmick.

  • M O Design

    I have to admit I’m impressed.  180k for a LEED certified 3 bedroom 2 bath 1 level home is doing pretty good!  Nice work Living Homes.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WLRQVIMDLAH4O3EGSYM5YQPIKA Tea

    The flat roof is going to pool water and leak. 170k is not low cost either for a pre fab that most likely won’t withstand a natural disaster. How does the heating work? Can you get heating electricity etc. during the cloudy winter months? It doesn’t look like the design would fit in on the east coast or many neighborhoods and the cost does not include land.

  • Chuck McClish

    LEED certified. What a joke. Just another way to extract money out of people without really helping the environment. Want eco friendly? Build an earthship house out of recycled tires or build with earth bags or straw bails. Recycle products that are already out there, don’t pollute more and put a LEED stamp on it.

  • JD

    I got excited when they said “low cost” — I was thinking less than $20000 in materials that I could assemble with 2 to 4 people helping out. Wow! What planet is this author from? $180K isn’t low cost for most. I’m looking for home designs that don’t put me in lifelong debt slavery to bankers. I want to build it myself as well. Go design that!

    • http://twitter.com/onreact_com Tad Chef

      Try the LV by Rocio Romero. It’s 40k plus transport and set up.

  • Mark Whipple

    Cool, an eco-trailer – just the thing for some tree-hugging moron who sucks his own Prius smug and buys carbon offsets for his farts.  I love the idea of greenie losers living in these things!

    • Steve D

       Take your insults somewhere else.  Why are you reading this website if you think people who care about construction quality, a healthy home and a new way of building are “greenie losers”?  To share your 12 year old vocabulary?  Your wealth of knowledge?  Go away so the rest of us can have a decent discussion.

  • Guest

    I saw this Saturday in Palm Springs but for some reason I was told it was $400,000 (with a bit of an attitude).  $180,000 actually seems affordable compared to most of the “green” prefabs. 

    I wasn’t very impressed by the fit and finish of the model.  The walls didn’t seem very square and I’ve seen better finish on a $200,000 stick built hillside home that was 2,200 square feet.

  • Ermaher1984

    Saw this unit on Saturday and have to agree with those that say it is ugly. If it was put in the middle of a forest it might blend in, but in a residential location it will look out of place. Actually, it gives the impression of a mobile home and if it has a steel I beam undercarriage then I would say it is exactly what describes a mobile home. $180K is too high and try to put this in Palm Desert, Palm Springs or Indian Wells and see how far you get. It will stand out like a ink spot on a white shirt. Yes, it is less than other prebuilt homes, but not as pretty.

    • T-wog

      HOW ABOUT SOME INFO ON THE HEATING SYSTEM !THAT’S WHERE MOST OF THE GREEN IS .

  • MrSteve007

    What a bunch of marketing BS!

    When you start looking at what they’re offering – their heat-pump is only SEER 15 (which is near the bottom of the barrel when it comes to efficiency, and barely meets code in many areas). Their ‘carbon-zero’ claim is only from paying BS carbon credits at the time of purchase. Solar panels are optional and not included with the price. I’m not exactly sure what is considered to be ‘cradle-to-cradle’ inspired as I’m sure hardy siding, quartz countertops and steel beam reinforcement doesn’t come close.

    Not impressed.

  • Timothy Stevens

    My view is that “affordable” is largely defined by where you live.  I am fairly certain this house could be constructed here for considerably less than the $179,000 asking price, but the reality is that I live in Michigan.  The housing market is still trashed, unemployment is high, the cost of labor is low, etc…  On the flip side, I have a hard time believing you could build this house anywhere near this price along either coast given the increased cost of labor. 

    The same is true of the prefab kits offered by Rocio Romero (my dream is to one day construct a LVL for my family); to construct identical houses in different areas of the country (say Michigan and Florida), you are going to see a considerable price difference for what is essentially the same house. 

    So I wouldn’t be so quick to peg the house as unaffordable; to some of us it is, but to other people it offers a better, and cheaper, alternative. 

    • Laura

       Thank you!  Finally someone with an intelligent point in this group of smug know-it-all commenters.  In my area, a low cost per square foot is anything under $250 for a detached single family home. 

  • Dunsterwilliam

    Despite the comments to the contrary this house is neither a
    remarkable achievement that will usher in a new era of green design or a
    terrible over priced green washed box. 
    It is somewhere in between. 

     

    The silly part thing is that people keep thinking that some
    different configurations of similar parts will all of sudden result in
    something that is significantly better or affordable.

     

    Some people will decided that this product is a good option
    for them and purchase it.  The
    validity of it’s an affordability will be determined by the market.  As for its “greenness” yes, it probably
    has lots of flaws, as does almost anything that tries to compete with anything remotely
    close to market rate.

     

    Maybe we should stop with the hyperbole and just describe
    projects like this as nice options that could make some people happy and be a little
    better for the environment than an average house. 

     

     

     

  • Dunsterwilliam

    Despite the comments to the contrary this house is neither a remarkable achievement that will usher in a new era of green design or a terrible over priced green washed box. It is somewhere in between. 

    The silly part thing is that people keep thinking that some different configurations of similar parts will all of sudden result in something that is significantly better or affordable.
     
    Some people will decided that this product is a good option for them and purchase it.  The validity of it’s an affordability will be determined by the market.  As for its “greenness” yes, it probably has lots of flaws, as does almost anything that tries to compete with anything remotely close to market rate.

    Maybe we should stop with the hyperbole and just describe projects like this as nice options that could make some people happy and be a little better for the environment than an average house. 

    [Ed. note - removed spaces between paragraphs]

  • Terry

    I love this one!

  • Anonymous

    Ever since seeing the Glidehouse in northern Cal, I keep looking optimistically @ these concepts and, frankly, feel that they are all conceived by and for wealthy people. End of story. Adorable little “play houses” that bored rich people can build and talk about and then move on to the next expensive fad. They build them on properties that cost more than the average wage-earner makes in a decade where they are eventually torn down and scrapped when the next CEO, defecating cash, buys the property and builds a giant house over the still-green concrete pad. That’s about all that is GREEN about it! The one good thing that comes out of it is that it provides a test lab of sorts (a rather mild one) where green materials can be incorporated and tested, so that real people, with jobs and mortgages and car payments can buy some of this stuff and use it in the mainstream world where products must compete and win. 

    Really, Mr. Mconough, you’ve lost touch, old SPORT! Small is good, but make it small AND truly affordable in the rational, real, everyday world of plain, hard-working people who want things that last, have taste beyond what realty TV would imply and have more than passing interest in the environment seeing as it will be their heads on the block when the environment rebels - not those of the “We MAY have to close the Palm Springs house this winter,” ilk, may they rot in a pool of av gas and fois gras. Whatever the hell that is.

    But, meanwhile, for all those who want to live in the pages of dwell magazine and talk like Thurston Howell III, fresh from a 1965 Scotch ad, go for it – it’s LOW-COST!

  • http://www.zcustomhomes.com/ custom homes Austin

    This is a beautiful low cost home that is worth acquiring. With proper planning, execution and the right interiors, a simple house like this can be transformed into a beautiful relaxing home.

  • Sfields

    I’ve been looking at the designs on this site or the last few weeks and although they are generally visually impressive and the LVL looks livable they seem over-architected and the prefab element does not seem to be delivering on reduced cost and construction time, which is another element of reduced cost.

    Frankly, it appears to me that very similar houses could be built for much less cost in the same or less time to similar energy performance standards using locally sourced structural panels in just about any market in the same about of time for less money. Put on a SIP roof for a modern look or a a conventional pitched roof and conventional siding to fit into an existing in-fill lot

  • http://twitter.com/StartlineAgency Startline Agency

    I have no idea if this is a solid home builder or not but looking at all the comments I felt compelled to offer my 2 cents. This type of home isn’t for everyone. It isn’t supposed to be. The very layout of the home would turn off 90% of the homebuyers out there. It’s not a cookie cutter home (for lack of a better term). These home designs are clearly aimed at people who are looking for something green yes, but also different, maybe even a bit eclectic. That’s their market and that’s why it isn’t necessarily cheap when compared to a typical stick built house in say the Chicago or St Louis suburbs where most people actually WANT a house that looks and feels typical or common. Personally I think the design of this home is very nice. And if you are a couple with no children or perhaps only one child and appreciate something somewhat unique then I can see this appealing to you. Again, I can’t speak to the quality of these homes. To me that would be everything. I like this house but would never purchase it unless I was totally convinced that the structure, flooring, windows, etc was very sound and the finishes are in-fact quality. You can’t ever know that unless you see one yourself. So right off the bat you would have to include airfare to California and a hotel stay. That alone probably eliminates 90% + of all prospective home buyers.

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