Survey: People Want More Green Homes

It turns out that a green, energy efficient home built with sustainable materials is “most wanted,” according to a Yahoo! Real Estate survey of 1,500 current and aspiring homeowners.  Homeowners prefer a green home (50%) over a custom home (38%), water view (38%), suburb (31%), or living on the beach (27%).  Yahoo! found that homeowners don’t want urban locations, gated communities, or castle-style homes.

Only 5% consider a tiny house to be a “dream house,” while only 10% want an ultra-modern home with glass walls.

When asked about the top reasons for moving, survey respondents said they want a home that suits their style (47%), that’s larger (45%), that suits a life stage (44%), or that’s in a better neighborhood (30%).  About 27% would consider it a top reason to move when the home is “more environmentally sustainable.

Lastly, about 59% of people responding said they would prefer to own a home.  When asked for their reasons for not owning a home yet, aspiring homeowners said they lack a down payment (53%), lack capital/income (51%), or have insufficient credit (38%).

So, what’s this saying about our housing culture at this point?  It seems people still want to own a home that’s spacious and in the suburbs — notwithstanding all sorts of talk about living in cities, downsizing, and renting — so long as the home is either green or energy efficient.  Thoughts?

[+] American Dream Homes Turn Green from Yahoo! Real Estate.


  • Justin

    My thoughts are the first paragraph is ridiculous.  Why can’t a custom home, water view, suburb, or living on the beach  be a Green Home???  Anyone of those can be built green.  

    Also, my experience as a homebuilder.  People say they want green.  But not if it gets in the way of a good financial investment, or location.  Both of which trump energy efficiency and sustainability in the customers mind.

    • http://www.jetsongreen.com Preston

      And, in all likelihood, the green home will be a custom home anyway.  But I think the point is to look at each factor in isolation.  Sure, not counting location, a waterfront home could be green, too.  But the waterfront aspect isn’t as desirable as the green aspect. 

  • http://www.ronestudio.wordpress.com Jeremiah

    What I think is most interesting and contradictory is the last statement in the first paragraph where potential homeowners don’t want “urban locations, gated communities or castle style homes”…..what exactly does that leave, I wonder? And I agree with Justin that any style of home can be designed and constructed with energy efficient and sustainable technologies.

    • http://www.jetsongreen.com Preston

      Certainly there’s some overlap, but when a factor is isolated, it’s not desired, apparently.  So people want non-urban locations.  They want something other than a castle-style home.  And they don’t want a gated community (my opinion on this one is people don’t find the value in HOA fees and don’t want to get bossed). 

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000147667969 Vernon Hampton Jr

        I agree with the castle-style homes message, though. I think the housing crash has gotten more potential homeowners thinking about the financial aspect of the home purchase. I personally did not look into a home once I found out what the HOA would and would not allow. I find it disappointing that I pay vast amounts of money for 10-20 years to be told that I could not paint my house sky blue trimmed in white.

        Energy efficiency and sustainability would be a blessing built into every home (or as many as humanly possible) but until we are able to fit needs and not charge someone’s first-born for it, it will be a hard sell.

  • http://www.HowleyGreenEnergy.com/ John Howley

    Steve Jobs figured out that consumers often don’t know what they want, especially when you are asking them about things that don’t exist, are not widely available, or are not yet affordable.  His genius was in figuring out what consumers would want if it were made available to them at a reasonable price, and then designing those choices with very consumer friendly and elegant feels.  Sustainable housing developers could learn a lot from his design and marketing genius.

    John Howley 
    http://www.HowleyGreenEnergy.com

  • http://twitter.com/AGHbuilders AGHbuilders

    Building a green home can be easily done in any area..with the right builders…
    Take a look at some of the great examples we have done…Fully sustainable houses, as well as very modern looking.
    Stop by http://www.aghbuilders.com and take a look around.
    All homes are green and custom!

  • http://www.floridamovers123.com/moving-companies/movers-tallahassee/ Shaunda Devins

    Well, it’s good to hear that more families nowadays are taking interest in environmentally sustainable houses. Moving into an energy-efficient house would be practical, regardless of the location. Aside from being eco-friendly, the energy-efficient technology would also help you reduce your electric bills in the long run.

  • http://www.cityblockteam.com/greenliving.php Calvin Mordarski

    Well, these statistics show how much awareness regarding climate change has increased. This information can serve as a savvy hint for homeowners who are up to selling their homes. Upgrading their homes with energy-efficient features would help them get a good deal for their homes.

  • http://www.hometoloudoun.com/ Clorindaaltavilla

    The eco-friendly features are not the only selling points of green houses. Aside from the minimal carbon footprint, these houses also promote healthy living with their designs. That’s because green homes are usually made of toxin-free materials, and most of these homes make use of natural lighting and ventilation. Imagine breathing in fresh air in the morning as you drink a cup of coffee, wouldn’t that make you healthy?

Popular Topics on Jetson Green