New Alkyd Paint Made with Old PET Bottles

A new paint technology from Sherwin-Williams has received an innovation award from the Environmental Protection Agency this week. The company’s Water-Based Acrylic Alkyd Technology, or WBAAT, is being awarded a 2011 Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award in the Designing Greener Chemicals category. The paint uses soybean oil and recycled PET plastic bottles to replace oil typically used in alkyd paint and, in doing so, reduces VOCs in the paint by 60%.

Although these are not zero-VOC paints, the products utilizing this technology include the ProClassic Interior Waterbased Acrylic-Alkyd, which has VOC content of less than 50 grams per liter, and the ProMar 200 Interior Waterbased Acrylic-Alkyd, which has less than 100 grams per liter.

Sherwin-Williams says the production of paints using this technology resulted in the elimination of 800,000 pounds of VOCs in 2010. Using the new formula, the company saves 1,000 barrels of oil and instead uses 320,000 pounds of soybean oil and 250,000 pounds of PET to make the paint. In addition to the oil savings, this also helps expand the market for recycled PET (#1 plastic), which is already a widely recycled plastic.

Credit: Sherwin Williams.


Article tags:

Popular Topics on Jetson Green