Articles - February, 2011

Watt Lumens, Water Savings, Home Energy Labels, + Passive House Action

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Nine Luxuriate LEED Homes in California

Nove — Italian for nine — is a handsome nine-unit project in the Mission District of San Francisco.  The green project features LEED Platinum certification and architectural design by Handel Architects.  And, with purchase prices in the range of $975,000 – $1,600,000, eight of nine units have already sold and closed, according to Builder Magazine.

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Natural Wool Insulation from Oregon

Insulation is one tough nut to crack. As if you don’t already have several options and factors to consider, I thought I’d mention one more: natural wool insulation by Oregon Shepherd.  The company makes batt (PermaBatt) and loose fill (PermaLoft) insulation products, and they both look pretty impressive on paper.  Oregon Shepard believes they have the “only loose fill, blown-in wool insulation in the world.

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Sustainable Luxury in the Vicino House

The Vicino House rests on a cliff overlooking about 180 degrees of Santa Monica Bay and the Pacific Ocean.  But the view isn’t the only thing worth mentioning with this gut renovation.  In fact, the Pacific Palisades home achieved LEED Platinum certification and all electricity is provided by a 28-panel, 5.2 kW rooftop photovoltaic array. Two solar thermal panels provide about 70% of the domestic hot water needs.

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Small, Modern, Efficient: Ogden House

Reader Viktor Stakhov was nice enough to share renderings of Ogden House, a contemporary home he designed for Missouri-based EuroDome.  The 1,778 square-foot house is meant for young professionals — the lower level has an open kitchen and living space while the upper level has a master suite and office space.  And that’s it.

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The Rise of the Passive House [The Tyee]

Passive House is an increasingly popular low-energy standard.  Passive Houses must be airtight (0.60 ACH at 50 Pascals) and low energy (4.75 kBTU/ft2/year max heating and cooling demand and 38 kBTU/ft2/year maximum primary demand) — requirements that slash energy demand by about 90%.  Due to increasing popularity of Passive House, media mentions like this mini-series in The Tyee — are becoming more common.

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