Pop Up House Prototype in Petaluma

Thacher-pop-up-house-exterior

If you liked the Ultimate Desert House, you’ll probably have some interest in this PopUp House from House Port. Pictured is a prototype of the PopUp House in Petaluma, California, which was built with SIPs and a metal house port. The actual home is shaded by a galvanized roof for natural ventilation, and the company has designs for one or two cube installations.

Thacher-pop-up-house-kitchen

Designed and conceived by Hally Thacher, the prototype house was built in just three months for $250,000, including labor, materials, and furniture. It has three bedrooms and two bathrooms in a considerable amount of square footage.

Leveraging the prototype, House Port intends to flat-pack ship these shelters across the country to willing buyers. Apparently, the single cube house sells for $75,000, and the double cube sells for $160,000, both ready to assemble on a foundation and site provided by the buyer.

The PopUp House package doesn’t include finishing materials, the kitchen, bathrooms, plumbing, lighting, or door, wall, or floor treatments. So a buyer is really getting the bare bones structure with a lot of flexibility in determining how green to complete the home.

Thacher-pop-up-house-bedroom

Thacher-pop-up-house-dining

Thacher-pop-up-house-common-area

Thacher-pop-up-house-side

[+] Learn more about the PopUp House from House Port.

Photo credits: Dwell and House Port Design; first noticed at Inhabitat.


  • Jay

    Simple yet effective design. I wonder if that same canopy would work in the South, where we have a lot of sun and high humidity. Certainly would catch the vast amounts of rain we have have, not to mention provide a means to heat water and add solar panels. Anyone know of a house in the South using this design?

  • SM

    As with the Ultimate Desert House, this is a cool idea, especially for arid climates with little natural shading–but all I can think of is the birds and other animals that would view the space between the sheltering canopy and the roof of the house as an ideal area to nest. I suppose bird netting or chicken wire could be used to block those spaces, but why deal with the issue in the first place?

  • Jay Chua

    This is gorgeous.
    I am particularly fond of the outdoor dining setting. The bed room also receive lots of sunlight..overall, green, and environmentally friendly.

    Jay Chua
    Publisher, PorchSwingSets.com

  • http://twitter.com/andrewstone Andrew Stone

    I am originally from the deep deserts of So. California and this was a pretty common design scenario out in the desert. However, the home under canopy was typically just a trailer.

  • ANON

Popular Topics on Jetson Green