Interlocking Polli-Brick Used for EcoARK

Polli-brick-taiwan-eco-ark-china-post

The web is alive with news that a Taiwan company has built a three-level exhibition hall — EcoARK — using about 1.5 million plastic bottles.  According to Reuters, the building was commissioned by Far Eastern Group and will be donated to city government in Taipei.  But what's really interesting is the fact that the objects used for the facade are more than simple plastic waste bottles.  The product being used here is called Polli-Brick from Hymini. 

Polli-brick-hymini

Polli-Brick is made with recycled PET bottles — kind of like with the 111 Navy Chair — to create an interlocking shape that's light weight and structural at the same time.  When connected, Polli-Brick almost looks like a honeycomb.  

The architectural blocks are translucent and allow natural light to filter through the material.  As used in the new EcoARK, the curtain wall is said to be able to withstand typhoons and earthquakes, according to The China Post.

The China Post also said EcoARK is "the world's lightest, movable, breathable environmental miracle … it can be taken apart and reassembled at another site after the exposition."  Sounds interesting …

[+] Learn more about Polli-Brick recycled architectural brick.
[+] Watch a BBC video of the EcoARK building in Taiwan.  

Polli-brick-theqspeaks

Polli-brick-strength-eco-ark-reuters

Polli-brick-eco-ark-inside-reuters

Photo credits: China Post (#1); Hymini (#2); theqspeaks (#3); Reuters (#4-5).


  • Giddy

    It’s been fun to watch this building go from the drawing board to where it is now. Take a look at the history of the Polli-Brick and the ECO Ark http://www.greenerpeople.com/forum/greener-building-and-remodeling/897-plastic-bricks.html

  • http://twitter.com/andrewstone Andrew Stone

    This reminded me of a post I read a long time ago about Heineken bottles that did the same thing back in 1963. It would be a wonderful thing to have this type of material sold to us with our water, beer, juice, etc., but I think it would frighten municipalities with a lot of backyard buildings being put up without proper permits….

    http://inhabitat.com/2007/10/11/heineken-wobo-the-brick-that-holds-beer/

  • Craig

    This misses the point. Recycling is great, and I am all for it, but this is way off base… There are 3 points to recycling. Reducing, Reuse and Recycle. Reusing, in this case the plastic content that has been recycled into a new form. The new form is still plastic. What happens when this building is set on fire? Has anyone smelled a burning tire?
    Using plastic for an exterior surface is just wrong. Can this company ensure that no plastic parts can be washed into the local river systems? On hot days does this building smell like a hot roof? This recycling is not good for the environment. This product is green wash….

    • Anonymous

      Hmmmmmmmm….there’s gotta be a work around.

    • Mygraneshaman_ace

      watch the episode for this on megastructures in national geographic. they considered all aspects like wind, typhoons, and fire as well.
      PET bottles were used for the bricks but it is covered with another layer of plastic (im not sure if it is plastic exactly) but is fire proof.

      • http://profiles.google.com/rtmaramba riiyo nakajima

        Correct. But I was wondering… that sheet that is fire/melt-proof was put on only ONE side right? When they assembled the building, that side was faced outside. What if the fire starts from inside? They’ll be doomed for sure. Game over.

  • http://www.epoxygreen.com/ Green Builder

    Love this site, plenty of fresh and relevant information for a change! Keep on posting informative eco-related articles :)

  • Anonymous

    Awesome! Now WHY can’t we ‘gather’ (no better word….I know it’s the size of Texas or larger by now) the ‘Pacific Trash Vortex’ up and do this with the crap?
    How many light weight houses could be erected (and re-erected if necessary) in earthquake zones and refugee camps, fer Christ sakes?

  • ed lozada

    I watched the ecoark documentary on megastructures on natgeo and it gave me an idea to make a raft out of used plastic bottles. I floods here when it rains particularly during rainy season and i am sure it can be very practical to use. it is light weight and can be stored easily. it can also be very inexpensive compared to the inflatable boats which can cost hundreds of thousands of pesos. I was wondering what bottles are used here. the bottles available here are round and are thin. I don’t think it will be good to use.

  • http://www.facebook.com/norie.sagun.5 Norie Sagun

    how much will the polli brick cost?

  • Pingback: Intertravamento Polli Brick-Usado para EcoARK | Inovatech

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  • flosy

    I think you would find the plastic sheet to lock the bottles was coated with PVC? Not nice, causes liver cancer.
    The PET bottles would be best used to supply disaster areas. Then use to build shelter? You could cross lock the bottles with UV stable twine. Unskilled people would do it in minutes. Fill them with piss? Waste store? Extract the Urea later for food growing? Think a little wider.
    Why waste all this energy cleaning then extruding. To blow mould a new bottle. Then ship an empty bottle.
    Flosy

  • flosy

    I think you would find the plastic sheet to lock the bottles was coated with PVC? Not nice, causes liver cancer.
    The PET bottles would be best used to supply disaster areas. Then use to build shelter? You could cross lock the bottles with UV stable twine. Unskilled people would do it in minutes. Fill them with piss? Waste store? Extract the Urea later for food growing? Think a little wider.
    Why waste all this energy cleaning then extruding. To blow mould a new bottle. Then ship an empty bottle.
    Flosy

  • Pingback: Taipei EcoARK Pavilion made from 1.5 Million POLLI-Bricks | Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building

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