Super Efficient Breezeway House in Utah

Outside

Update: Read our owner interview with more background on this project.

This beautiful home will be the first certified Passive House in Utah.  Passive House consultant Dave Brach, principal of Brach Design Architecture, anticipates receiving a certificate in the next week or so.  He designed the Breezeway House to consume only 10% of the energy of an existing single family home of the same size and location and 20% of the energy of a new home built to code.  What’s more, solar electric and hot water panels should produce about 75% of the home’s annual energy needs.

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Brach had such a good time designing this house and working with the Passive House standard that he fully expects to do nothing but Passive House design going forward.  He told Jetson Green in an email, “It’s not easy, but it’s the smartest way to design a building.

Smart design in this case had a tight budget, too.  In terms of construction costs, the premium to upgrade from a standard code house to Passive House was about $10 per square foot.

The Breezeway House was built by Fisher Custom Building for a couple who set up a website, Our Passive House, to document the process.  You can read more about the construction specifications here and how the home was built to pursue such aggressive efficiency goals.

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Photo credits: Wold Creative.


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  • Anonymous

    Very beautiful house. I found it so attractive that I am again and again watching the pics.

  • http://slcurban.com/ SLC Urban

    Such an amazing home! I absolutely love everything I have ever seen David Brach do. He has a very creative mind and builds for the sake of good building first and green just naturally flows from that process. That is the way it should always be done!

  • http://www.righthomesales.co.uk/ We Buy Houses

    The house really looks great. I just bought a new house for me and my family though its not as elegant as this one on the photo but its cozy and it has a nice aroma surrounding it.

  • http://www.ace-electrical.com Richard Erney, Ace Electrical

    Our firm, Ace Electrical took care of the electrical work on this project. We were certainly glad to be involved in a project that is pushing the envelope in energy standards at a reasonable price. Kudos to Dave on the design work and to Mark Fisher for making it happen.

  • Kate

    This house is inspiring – so beautiful and so efficient! I’ve been looking for ways to retrofit my own home to make it more passive – windows and doors seem to be a challenge. Do you know what brand was used here? The only ones I’ve found so with high R-value and complete tuning packages are SeriousWindows (http://www.seriousglass.com/residential/super-insulating-windows/fiberglass/925-series.html). Any experience with these?

  • Dpollard

    Did you notice that most of these comments start with a comment on the aesthetics and then move to energy. To me this is the way to approach (and sell) “green” architecture. I suffered through a workshop on passive house recently and the presenters (who were PH designers and builders) constantly apologized for the way their houses looked … leaving behind a message which was if you want to be energy efficent you have to be ugly….GOOD GRIEF,one step forwards and two backwards!

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