Green Hybrid Residence for a Briard

Residence for a Briard

Designed by Sander Architects, this part prefab, all custom-made home was recently profiled in the NY Times in an article entitled "Prefab, High-Concept, and Green."  The exposed denim insulation and loft-like interior caught my eye, so I decided to learn more about it.  Apparently, the owners retained Sander Architects to build something that was very green, on a super-tight budget, and amenable to the owner’s large French Briard dog.  The resulting 4,200 sf home, according to the architects, is their greenest Hybrid House ever built.  It features a greywater system, passive heating and cooling, rainwater collection for landscaping, recycled blue jean insulation, sunflower seed wall board, bamboo flooring, marmoleum, structural steel frames from recycled steel, etc. 

Culver City Prefab

I think you’ll agree that this Residence for a Briard is quite the home.  As a custom-built, architect-designed residence of this size, the owners seem to have made out quite well, in California terms.  The completed cost was $500k, or $130 psf.  Here are a few more materials and strategies that help make this Culver City prefab green:

  • Rental unit increases density
  • Proximate to public transportation
  • Basic amenities in walking distance
  • Site orientation maximizes passive heating and cooling
  • Extensive glazing maximizes natural day lighting
  • Multi-cell acrylic panels with high R-value reduce heat gain
  • Recycled steel framing reduces overall costs and use of new steel
  • Low-water and xeriscape landscaping and plants
  • Sustainable kitchen and bathroom cabinetry
  • On-demand water heater
  • Radiant heat connected to on-demand hot water
  • Low-flush toilets and Energy Star appliances
  • Low-VOC paints

Sander Architects Prefab Home

Sander Architects Prefab Interior Sander Architects Prefab Great Room

Sander Architects Home Study Nook

Photo credits: Sander Architects.


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  • Keyth

    Esposed cavity insulation?
    Denim good?
    Exposed (not enclosed on 4 sides) bad!
    Thermally bridged by framing? Bad too!

    • http://www.jetsongreen.com Preston

      Okay, they’ve made some trade offs, but it’s still an interesting house and case study.

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