Articles - October, 2006

ParkUrbia: PB+CO's Green Home Concept

Parkurbia Lake

I noticed this futuristic, yet realistic, home concept in the latest issue of Popular Science.  It’s was designed by PB+CO (aka Philippe Barriere Collective) and "reflects the desire to create socially responsible communities with an environmental ethos.  The idea is to converge the scattered remnants and residual land ‘vacancies’ mapped by the uneven contours of a disassembled suburbia, to reclaim them as Readymade Parks and, finally, to recycle the undefined ‘greenways,’ which will constitute inhabitable wooded Public Parks:  Parkurbia." 

Parkurbia Home The prototype is based on the desire for housing with a minimal environmental footprint.  It incorporates recycled materials and translucent photovoltaic films that provide electricity and filtered natural light.  I think it’s a nice idea actually:  there are active windows for ventilation, two floors with a balcony, and intrinsic flood-protected design.  It’s modern, too.  What more could you ask for? 

Fort Bliss Plans to Create Largest, 10 SQ Mile Solar Farm

Ron_tudor_with_test_panels We don’t need no stinkin’ coal!  Fort Bliss is right on the money with their visionary plan to build a 1-gigawatt (yes, that’s what the article says), 10 square mile solar farm at Fort Bliss by 2010.  That’s a big solar farm, and supposedly, the largest solar farm in existence is the 12-megawatt one in Germany.  Various projects and technology development will continue under a partnership between Fort Bliss and the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California.  The new technology, including a controller than can extract energy even on overcast days, should cut the cost of solar energy in half. 

U.S. Representative Silvestre Reyes (D-Texas) says the coal plants may not be necessary if the solar technology lives up to expectations.  The plan is to start powering Fort Bliss, and later, energy can be pumped into the national power grid to be exported nationwide.  In January 2007, post engineers will begin installing a 1.5 megawatt system.  After that, the project should explode with 20 megawatts in 2007, 40 megawatts in 2008, and 1 gigawatt in 2009. 

Interesting Applications:
"The new technology, which has been in development for about three years, is already charging the battery packs of soldiers in the 18th Airborne Corps and the 75th Ranger Regiment in Iraq and Afghanistan, Tudor said. That equipment includes hood-mounted Humvee panels that also can charge the vehicle’s battery, pack-mounted systems that charge batteries as a soldier walks, and tent-mounted systems that can provide power for a heated sleeping pad and to charge other batteries." via El Paso Times.  See also KVIA News Report

Skyscraper Sunday: Hunt Consolidated Office Tower Going LEED Green?

Rendering_1 About one year ago yesterday, Hunt Consolidated Inc. broke ground on a new office tower, which borders on Akard Street and Woodall Rogers Freeway.  You’ve probably seen it, it has massive cement beams curving on its northerly face.  The building is being developed by Woodbine Development Corporation, which is partially owned somehow in the Hunt Consolidated Empire.  I heard from a friend (hearsay, I know) that Chairman Ray Hunt, or some other c-level executive, was asked at a luncheon whether the building was going to be green and he equivocated saying something like, "Well, we’re not going to build green just to build green, but we’ll do it if there are tangible economic reasons to do it."

Rendering2_1 I did some research and it looks like Hunt Consolidated Office Tower is registered with the USGBC as LEED-CI v2.0, otherwise know as the green ratings standard for commercial interiors.  If my understanding is correct, that building is to be 100% owner-occupied, so Hunt is going green inside?  Not sure.  Here’s what I know.  It will be a $120 million, 400,000 square foot, 15 story building.  Gensler, which is #2 in the US for having the largest number of LEED Accredited Professionals, will be doing the interiors.  So they have the know-how to go green on the inside.  The entire structure was designed by Dallas-based Beck Group and the general contractor is Austin Commercial.  Looks like it may be going green, but if the decision is still in the air, here’s my two cents:  what’s more economic incentive to build green than a $6.3 million tax abatement over 10 years?  That abatement should cover the 1% premium (if that) required to go green.   

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